Raw drifter data from RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer and ARSV Laurence M. Gould cruises NBP0103, LMG0103, LMG0201A, and NBP0202 in the Southern Ocean from 2001-2002 (SOGLOBEC project)

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/2365
Data Type: Cruise Results
Version: 1
Version Date: 2012-06-18

Project
» U.S. GLOBEC Southern Ocean (SOGLOBEC)

Program
» U.S. GLOBal ocean ECosystems dynamics (U.S. GLOBEC)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Limeburner, RichardWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)Principal Investigator
Allison, DickyWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager
Rauch, ShannonWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager

Abstract
The following was extracted from the Cruise Report of the N.B. Palmer Cruise 01-03: 2.0 Drifter Measurements (Bob Beardsley and Dick Limeburner) Surface drifters are being deployed and tracked via satellite to study the near surface Lagrangian currents in the SO GLOBEC study area on the western Antarctic Peninsula Shelf. Each drifter has a small (~ 30 cm diameter) surface float with ARGOS transmitter and batteries tethered to a holey sock drogue centered at 15 m below the surface. The drogue, about 10 m tall and 1 m in diameter, is designed to "lock" itself to the water so that the surface float follows the mean water motion at 15 m depth with very little slippage even in high winds. Thus measuring the drifter's position as a function of time provides a Lagrangian measurement of the 15-m ocean current.


Coverage

Spatial Extent: N:-60.282 E:-60.319 S:-70.457 W:-77.556
Temporal Extent: 2001-03-26 - 2002-04-16

Dataset Description

ARGOS Tracked Near Surface Drifter Data
The following was extracted from the Cruise Report of the N.B. Palmer Cruise 01-03. The complete cruise report can be seen here or on the SO GLOBEC web site under the object "Inventory"

2.0 Drifter Measurements (Bob Beardsley and Dick Limeburner)
Surface drifters are being deployed and tracked via satellite to study the near surface Lagrangian currents in the SO GLOBEC study area on the western Antarctic Peninsula Shelf. Each drifter has a small (~ 30 cm diameter) surface float with ARGOS transmitter and batteries tethered to a holey sock drogue centered at 15 m below the surface. The drogue, about 10 m tall and 1 m in diameter, is designed to "lock" itself to the water so that the surface float follows the mean water motion at 15 m depth with very little slippage even in high winds. Thus measuring the drifter's position as a function of time provides a Lagrangian measurement of the 15-m ocean current.


Data contributed by:
Richard Limeburner
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Woods Hole, MA 02543
e-mail: rlimeburner@whoi.edu

file updated June 18 2012; smr.


Processing Description

BCO-DMO made the following changes to the formatting of the data: Calculated actual 'yrday_gmt' values from the original 'yrday_special' column; Added cruiseid; Re-formatted all values from scientific notation to integers; Added month_gmt, day_gmt, and time_gmt.


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
yearFour-digit year. dimensionless
drifteridPI assigned drifter identification number. dimensionless
argosidARGOS assigned drifter identification. dimensionless
date_start_gmtDate the drifter was initially deployed; reported as month/day/year, i.e. 3/26/01, GMT. dimensionless
time_gmtTime of day as hours and minutes (HHMM format), GMT. dimensionless
lat_startLatitude where drifter was deployed, negative = South. decimal degrees
lon_startLongitude where drifter was deployed, negative = West. decimal degrees
commentsIf drifter was deployed at a mooring site, mooring name is reported. N/A
yrday_gmtDecimal year day (January 1, at 1200 hr. = year day 1.5). Decimal year day
lonLongitude, negative = West. decimal degrees
latLatitude, negative = South. decimal degrees
temp_ssSea surface temperature; depth of sensor unknown or variable; temp data uncorrected, has errors. degrees C
depth_drifterDrifter submergence in meters - uncorrected, has errors. meters
year_startYear when the drifter was initially deployed. dimensionless
cruise_idIdentifier for the cruise on which the drifter was initially deployed. dimensionless
time_start_gmtTime at which the drifter was initially deployed as hours and minutes (HHMM), GMT. dimensionless
month_gmtMonth of year (01 to 12); calculated from yrday_gmt. dimensionless
day_gmtDay of month (01 to 31); calculated from yrday_gmt. dimensionless


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Instruments

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Drifter Buoy
Generic Instrument Name
Beardsley Drifter
Dataset-specific Description
Each drifter has a small (~ 30 cm diameter) surface float with ARGOS transmitter and batteries tethered to a holey sock drogue centered at 15 m below the surface.
Generic Instrument Description
Beardsley Drifters are near-surface satellite-tracked drifters used for observations of circulation patterns. They are WOCE-style drifters featuring holey sock drogues. Each drifter has a small (~ 30 cm diameter) surface float with ARGOS transmitter and batteries tethered to a holey sock drogue centered at 15 m below the surface. The drogue, about 10 m tall and 1 m in diameter, is designed to "lock" itself to the water so that the surface float follows the mean water motion at 15 m depth with very little slippage even in high winds. Thus measuring the drifter's position as a function of time provides a Lagrangian measurement of the 15-m ocean current.


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Deployments

NBP0103

Website
Platform
RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer
Report
Start Date
2001-04-24
End Date
2001-06-05
Description
Acquisition Description
2.0 Drifter Measurements (Bob Beardsley and Dick Limeburner) Surface drifters are being deployed and tracked via satellite to study the near surface Lagrangian currents in the SO GLOBEC study area on the western Antarctic Peninsula Shelf. Each drifter has a small (~ 30 cm diameter) surface float with ARGOS transmitter and batteries tethered to a holey sock drogue centered at 15 m below the surface. The drogue, about 10 m tall and 1 m in diameter, is designed to "lock" itself to the water so that the surface float follows the mean water motion at 15 m depth with very little slippage even in high winds. Thus measuring the drifter's position as a function of time provides a Lagrangian measurement of the 15-m ocean current.

LMG0103

Website
Platform
ARSV Laurence M. Gould
Report
Start Date
2001-03-18
End Date
2001-04-13
Description
Acquisition Description
2.0 Drifter Measurements (Bob Beardsley and Dick Limeburner) Surface drifters are being deployed and tracked via satellite to study the near surface Lagrangian currents in the SO GLOBEC study area on the western Antarctic Peninsula Shelf. Each drifter has a small (~ 30 cm diameter) surface float with ARGOS transmitter and batteries tethered to a holey sock drogue centered at 15 m below the surface. The drogue, about 10 m tall and 1 m in diameter, is designed to "lock" itself to the water so that the surface float follows the mean water motion at 15 m depth with very little slippage even in high winds. Thus measuring the drifter's position as a function of time provides a Lagrangian measurement of the 15-m ocean current.

LMG0201A

Website
Platform
ARSV Laurence M. Gould
Report
Start Date
2002-02-06
End Date
2002-03-03
Description
Acquisition Description
2.0 Drifter Measurements (Bob Beardsley and Dick Limeburner) Surface drifters are being deployed and tracked via satellite to study the near surface Lagrangian currents in the SO GLOBEC study area on the western Antarctic Peninsula Shelf. Each drifter has a small (~ 30 cm diameter) surface float with ARGOS transmitter and batteries tethered to a holey sock drogue centered at 15 m below the surface. The drogue, about 10 m tall and 1 m in diameter, is designed to "lock" itself to the water so that the surface float follows the mean water motion at 15 m depth with very little slippage even in high winds. Thus measuring the drifter's position as a function of time provides a Lagrangian measurement of the 15-m ocean current.

NBP0202

Website
Platform
RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer
Report
Start Date
2002-04-09
End Date
2002-05-21
Description
Acquisition Description
2.0 Drifter Measurements (Bob Beardsley and Dick Limeburner) Surface drifters are being deployed and tracked via satellite to study the near surface Lagrangian currents in the SO GLOBEC study area on the western Antarctic Peninsula Shelf. Each drifter has a small (~ 30 cm diameter) surface float with ARGOS transmitter and batteries tethered to a holey sock drogue centered at 15 m below the surface. The drogue, about 10 m tall and 1 m in diameter, is designed to "lock" itself to the water so that the surface float follows the mean water motion at 15 m depth with very little slippage even in high winds. Thus measuring the drifter's position as a function of time provides a Lagrangian measurement of the 15-m ocean current.


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Project Information

U.S. GLOBEC Southern Ocean (SOGLOBEC)


Coverage: Southern Ocean


The fundamental objectives of United States Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (U.S. GLOBEC) Program are dependent upon the cooperation of scientists from several disciplines. Physicists, biologists, and chemists must make use of data collected during U.S. GLOBEC field programs to further our understanding of the interplay of physics, biology, and chemistry. Our objectives require quantitative analysis of interdisciplinary data sets and, therefore, data must be exchanged between researchers. To extract the full scientific value, data must be made available to the scientific community on a timely basis.



[ table of contents | back to top ]

Program Information

U.S. GLOBal ocean ECosystems dynamics (U.S. GLOBEC)


Coverage: Global


U.S. GLOBEC (GLOBal ocean ECosystems dynamics) is a research program organized by oceanographers and fisheries scientists to address the question of how global climate change may affect the abundance and production of animals in the sea.

The U.S. GLOBEC Program currently had major research efforts underway in the Georges Bank / Northwest Atlantic Region, and the Northeast Pacific (with components in the California Current and in the Coastal Gulf of Alaska). U.S. GLOBEC was a major contributor to International GLOBEC efforts in the Southern Ocean and Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP).



[ table of contents | back to top ]

Funding

Funding SourceAward
National Science Foundation (NSF)
NSF Antarctic Sciences (NSF ANT)

[ table of contents | back to top ]