Integrated daily incident PAR from R/V Endeavor, R/V Atlantis II cruises EN198, AII-119-4, AII-119-5 in the North Atlantic in 1989 (U.S. JGOFS NABE project)

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/2571
Version: December 4, 1995
Version Date: 1995-12-04

Project
» U.S. JGOFS North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (NABE)

Program
» U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Broenkow, WilliamMoss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML)Principal Investigator
Chandler, Cynthia L.Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager


Dataset Description

Integrated daily incident PAR (400-700 nm)

Acquisition Description

  PI:              William Broenkow
  of:              Moss Landing Marine Laboratories
  dataset:         MLML - Integrated daily incident PAR (400-700 nm)
  dates:           April 25, 1989 to June 7, 1989
  location:        N: 60.7483  S: 41.066  W: -26.0615  E: -17.67
  project/cruise:  North Atlantic Bloom Experiment cruises
  ship:            Atlantis II


  Note:   "Clear sky irradiance" (Frouin et al 1989, JGR) 
             is given at nominal stations
          (47N 21W and 59.5N 21W) for ozone 0.3, water 2.5.
          PAR irradiance was measured by LiCor Type LI-190SA cosine sensor.
          Scalar (spherical) PAR was measured by LiCor type LI-193-SB 
             for MLML incubator.

  Ref:    JGOFS North Atlantic Bloom long track and vertical profiling results.
          W.W. Broenkow, R.E. Reaves and M.A. Yarbrough  MLML Tech Pub 90-1
          Recorded: 14:16:19  16-FEB-90

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Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
latlatitude nearest to noon each day from event log, minus = south decimal degrees
lonlongitude nearest to noon each day from event log, minus = west decimal degrees
dateDate of Daily Integrated Irradiances YYYYMMDD
day_serSerial day beginning Jan. 1, 1900
par_intIntegrated Incident PAR 400-700nm moles/m^2
par_peakPeak PAR 400-700nm Incident Irradiance umole/sec/m^2
time_intTotal integrated time hours
par_int_sIntegrated Spherical PAR 400-700nm moles/m^2
par_peak_sPeak Spherical PAR 400-700nm Irradiance umole/sec/m^2
time_2_intTotal Time integrated hours
par_dailyDaily Clear Sky PAR 400-700nm Irradiance moles/m^2


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Instruments

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
LiCor Underwater Spectrial Quantum Sensor
Generic Instrument Name
LI-COR LI-193 PAR Sensor
Generic Instrument Description
The LI-193 Underwater Spherical Quantum Sensor uses a Silicon Photodiode and glass filters encased in a waterproof housing to measure PAR (in the 400 to 700 nm waveband) in aquatic environments. Typical output is in micromol s-1 m-2. The LI-193 Sensor gives an added dimension to underwater PAR measurements as it measures photon flux from all directions. This measurement is referred to as Photosynthetic Photon Flux Fluence Rate (PPFFR) or Quantum Scalar Irradiance. This is important, for example, when studying phytoplankton, which utilize radiation from all directions for photosynthesis. LI-COR began producing Spherical Quantum Sensors in 1979; serial numbers for the LI-193 begin with SPQA-XXXXX (licor.com).


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Deployments

EN198

Website
Platform
R/V Endeavor
Start Date
1989-06-28
End Date
1989-07-07
Description
post bloom cruise; 7 locations; 63°N 25°W to 59°N 14°W

Acquisition Description
dates: June 28, 1989 to July 7, 1989 location: N: 62.9483 S: 59.2933 W: -24.2033 E: -14.9667 project/cruise: North Atlantic Bloom Experiment/Endeavor 198 ships: Endeavor

AII-119-5

Website
Platform
R/V Atlantis II
Start Date
1989-05-15
End Date
1989-06-06
Description
late bloom cruise; 31 locations; 61N 22W to 41N 17W

Acquisition Description
project/cruise: North Atlantic Bloom Experiment/Atlantis II 119, leg 5 ship: Atlantis II

AII-119-4

Website
Platform
R/V Atlantis II
Start Date
1989-04-17
End Date
1989-05-11
Description
early bloom cruise; 17 locations; 60N 21W to 46N 18W

Acquisition Description
project/cruise: North Atlantic Bloom Experiment/Atlantis II 119, leg 4 ship: Atlantis II


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Project Information

U.S. JGOFS North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (NABE)


Coverage: North Atlantic


One of the first major activities of JGOFS was a multinational pilot project, North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (NABE), carried out along longitude 20° West in 1989 through 1991. The United States participated in 1989 only, with the April deployment of two sediment trap arrays at 48° and 34° North. Three process-oriented cruises where conducted, April through July 1989, from R/V Atlantis II and R/V Endeavor focusing on sites at 46° and 59° North. Coordination of the NABE process-study cruises was supported by NSF-OCE award # 8814229. Ancillary sea surface mapping and AXBT profiling data were collected from NASA's P3 aircraft for a series of one day flights, April through June 1989.

A detailed description of NABE and the initial synthesis of the complete program data collection efforts appear in: Topical Studies in Oceanography, JGOFS: The North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (1993), Deep-Sea Research II, Volume 40 No. 1/2.

The U.S. JGOFS Data management office compiled a preliminary NABE data report of U.S. activities: Slagle, R. and G. Heimerdinger, 1991. U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study, North Atlantic Bloom Experiment, Process Study Data Report P-1, April-July 1989. NODC/U.S. JGOFS Data Management Office, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 315 pp. (out of print).



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Program Information

U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS)


Coverage: Global


The United States Joint Global Ocean Flux Study was a national component of international JGOFS and an integral part of global climate change research.

The U.S. launched the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) in the late 1980s to study the ocean carbon cycle. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. As we studied ocean biogeochemistry, we learned that our simple views of carbon uptake and transport were severely limited, and a new "wave" of ocean science was born. U.S. JGOFS has been supported primarily by the U.S. National Science Foundation in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of Energy and the Office of Naval Research. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP).



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Funding

Funding SourceAward
National Science Foundation (NSF)

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