Meteorological data from surface mooring from WHOI surface moorings deployed in the Arabian Sea in 1995 (U.S. JGOFS Arabian Sea project)

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/2595
Data Type: Other Field Results
Version: November 7, 1997
Version Date: 1997-11-07

Project
» U.S. JGOFS Arabian Sea (Arabian Sea)

Program
» U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Weller, Robert A.Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)Principal Investigator
Chandler, Cynthia L.Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager


Dataset Description

Meteorological data from surface mooring at 15.5N, 61.5E from October 1994 until October 1995


Acquisition Description

See Platform deployments for cruise specific documentation


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
yearyear of observation, either 1994 or 1995
yrdayDay of year for 1994, January 1 00:00 is day 1.0 observations begin October 16, 1994 (day 289) Note that this number con tinues to increment by one until end of observations and does not initialize to 1 on January 1, 1995
temp_airAdjusted air temperature degrees C
temp_surfSea surface temperature from 0.17m Tpod degress C
humid_relRelative humidty (from VAWR) percent
humid_specSpecific humidity (from IMET) grams/kilogram
wind_sp_EEast wind meters/second
wind_sp_NNorth wind meters/second
press_barBarometric pressure millibars
rad_in_swIncoming shortwave radiation Watts/meter^2
rad_in_lwIncoming longwave radiation Watts/meter^2
precipPrecipitation rate meters/second


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Instruments

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Vector-Averaging Wind Recorder
Generic Instrument Name
Vector-Averaging Wind Recorder
Generic Instrument Description
The Vector-Averaging Wind Recorder (VAWR) is a system designed by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) to make surface meteorological measurements. The standard WHOI Vector Averaging Wind Recorder (VAWR) of the late 1980s through early 1990s was mounted on a toroid buoy (Dean and Beardsley, 1988). In addition to wind speed and direction, the VAWR could also be configured to record water temperature and conductivity data from sensors mounted at 1 meter depth on the mooring bridle of the buoy (Trask et al., 1995). References: Dean, JP and RC Beardsley. 1988. A vector-averaging wind recorder (VWAR) system for surface meteorological measurements in CODE (Coastal Ocean Dynamics Experiment). Published by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Woods Hole Mass. Series: CODE technical report no. 44., WHOI-88-20, WHOI Technical report (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution). 74 pp. Trask, Richard P.; Way, Bryan S.; Ostrom, William M.; Allsup, Geoffrey P.; Weller, Robert A. 1995. Arabian Sea mixed layer dynamics experiment : mooring deployment cruise report R/V Thomas Thompson cruise number 40, 11 October-25 October 1994. (WHOI DLA URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1912/482)

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Improved Meteorological Recorder
Generic Instrument Name
Improved Meteorological Recorder
Generic Instrument Description
An IMET Recorder is an instrument package that can be mounted on a ship or buoy to record mean weather data including air and sea-surface temperature, incoming short and long-wave radiation, precipitation, humidity, wind velocity and barometric pressure. Each sensor in the system communicates digitally and returns calibrated values to a central data recorder.

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Eppley Longwave Radiometer
Generic Instrument Name
Eppley Longwave Radiometer
Generic Instrument Description
The Eppley Precision Infrared Radiometer (PIR) pyrgeometer measures longwave (infrared) radiation. It is housed in a weatherproof titanium canister that has been painted with a very flat black paint that absorbs radiation. A small glass dome at the top of the instrument is covered with an 'interference coating' which allows only infrared radiation to come through. Light levels are detected as temperature changes creating voltages in fine wire coil detectors. more from Eppley Labs


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Deployments

JGOFS_WH_buoy_dep2

Website
Platform
WHOI surface mooring
Start Date
1995-04-15
End Date
1995-10-19
Description
Woods Hole Surface Mooring Deployment 2 A surface mooring was deployed off the coast of Oman along the climatological axis of the Findlater Jet from October 1994 to October 1995. The location chosen for the surface mooring, 15.5°N, 61.5°E, was close to the climatological maximum in the wind speed during the height of the Southwest Monsoon. Two separate mooring deployments, the first beginning October 15, 1994, and ending April 20, 1995, and the second starting April 22, 1995, and ending October 10, 1995, were used so that a second set of freshly calibrated sensors was deployed prior to the onset of the Southwest Monsoon. Reference: Weller, R.A., M.F. Baumgartner, S.A. Josey, A.S. Fischer and J.C. Kindle (1998). Atmospheric forcing in the Arabian Sea during 1994-1995:observations and comparisons with climatology and models. Deep-Sea Research II, 45(10-11): 1961-1999, U.S. JGOFS Contribution No. 419.

JGOFS_WH_buoy_dep1

Website
Platform
WHOI surface mooring
Start Date
1994-10-16
End Date
1995-10-19
Description
Woods Hole Surface Mooring Deployment 1 A surface mooring was deployed off the coast of Oman along the climatological axis of the Findlater Jet from October 1994 to October 1995. The location chosen for the surface mooring, 15.5°N, 61.5°E, was close to the climatological maximum in the wind speed during the height of the Southwest Monsoon. Two separate mooring deployments, the first beginning October 15, 1994, and ending April 20, 1995, and the second starting April 22, 1995, and ending October 10, 1995, were used so that a second set of freshly calibrated sensors was deployed prior to the onset of the Southwest Monsoon. Reference: Weller, R.A., M.F. Baumgartner, S.A. Josey, A.S. Fischer and J.C. Kindle (1998). Atmospheric forcing in the Arabian Sea during 1994-1995:observations and comparisons with climatology and models. Deep-Sea Research II, 45(10-11): 1961-1999, U.S. JGOFS Contribution No. 419.

TT040

Website
Platform
R/V Thomas G. Thompson
Start Date
1994-10-11
End Date
1994-10-25
Description
Mooring Deployment Cruise

TT046

Website
Platform
R/V Thomas G. Thompson
Start Date
1995-04-14
End Date
1995-04-29
Description
Mooring Recovery and Redeployment Cruise


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Project Information

U.S. JGOFS Arabian Sea (Arabian Sea)


Coverage: Arabian Sea


The U.S. Arabian Sea Expedition which began in September 1994 and ended in January 1996, had three major components: a U.S. JGOFS Process Study, supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF); Forced Upper Ocean Dynamics, an Office of Naval Research (ONR) initiative; and shipboard and aircraft measurements supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Expedition consisted of 17 cruises aboard the R/V Thomas Thompson, year-long moored deployments of five instrumented surface buoys and five sediment-trap arrays, aircraft overflights and satellite observations. Of the seventeen ship cruises, six were allocated to repeat process survey cruises, four to SeaSoar mapping cruises, six to mooring and benthic work, and a single calibration cruise which was essentially conducted in transit to the Arabian Sea.



[ table of contents | back to top ]

Program Information

U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS)


Coverage: Global


The United States Joint Global Ocean Flux Study was a national component of international JGOFS and an integral part of global climate change research.

The U.S. launched the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) in the late 1980s to study the ocean carbon cycle. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. As we studied ocean biogeochemistry, we learned that our simple views of carbon uptake and transport were severely limited, and a new "wave" of ocean science was born. U.S. JGOFS has been supported primarily by the U.S. National Science Foundation in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of Energy and the Office of Naval Research. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP).



[ table of contents | back to top ]