Microplankton grazing; herbivory from RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer NBP-96-4A, NBP-97-1, NBP-97-3, NBP-97-8 cruises in the Southern Ocean in 1997 (U.S. JGOFS AESOPS project)

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/2734
Version: March 13, 2000
Version Date: 2000-03-13

Project
» U.S. JGOFS Antarctic Environment and Southern Ocean Process Study (AESOPS)

Program
» U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Caron, DavidUniversity of Southern California (USC-HIMS)Principal Investigator
Lonsdale, Darcy J.Stony Brook University (SUNY Stony Brook)Co-Principal Investigator
Chandler, Cynthia L.Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager


Dataset Description

Microplankton grazing; herbivory

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Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
eventevent number from event log
stastation number from event log
castcast number
cast_typeCTD = CTD rosette TM = Trace Metal rosette
depth_nnominal sample depth meters
size_fracsize fraction code 200 = dimensionless
seawaterseawater dilution code 1.2 = dimensionless
flag_yyeast addition code 0 = no yeast extract addition 1 = 1 milligram per liter yeast extract addition (final concentration) 10 = 10 milligram per liter yeast extract addition (final concentration) dimensionless
microzoo_grazemicrozooplankton grazing on phytoplankton per day
flag_gzero = slope not significantly different from zero at the 0.05 level
phyto_growth_netnet phytoplankton growth rate per day


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Instruments

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Niskin Bottle
Generic Instrument Name
Niskin bottle
Dataset-specific Description
CTD clean rosette (Niskin) bottles were used to collect water samples.
Generic Instrument Description
A Niskin bottle (a next generation water sampler based on the Nansen bottle) is a cylindrical, non-metallic water collection device with stoppers at both ends. The bottles can be attached individually on a hydrowire or deployed in 12, 24, or 36 bottle Rosette systems mounted on a frame and combined with a CTD. Niskin bottles are used to collect discrete water samples for a range of measurements including pigments, nutrients, plankton, etc.

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Trace Metal Bottle
Generic Instrument Name
Trace Metal Bottle
Dataset-specific Description
Trace metal (TM) clean rosette bottles were used to collect water samples.
Generic Instrument Description
Trace metal (TM) clean rosette bottle used for collecting trace metal clean seawater samples.


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Deployments

NBP-96-04A

Website
Platform
RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer
Report
Start Date
1996-10-02
End Date
1996-11-08
Description
Ross Sea Process Study 1

Acquisition Description
PI: David Caron (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) and Darcy Lonsdale (State University of New York, Stony Brook) dataset: Microplankton grazing; herbivory dates: October 18, 1996 to November 04, 1996 location: N: -76.3627 S: -77.8788 W: 168.9800 E: -175.8900 project/cruise: AESOPS/NBP-96-4A - Ross Sea Process 1 Cruise ship: R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Methodology

NBP-97-01

Website
Platform
RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer
Report
Start Date
1997-01-13
End Date
1997-02-11
Description
Ross Sea Process Study 2

Acquisition Description
PI: David Caron (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) and Darcy Lonsdale (State University of New York, Stony Brook) dataset: Microplankton grazing; herbivory dates: January 13, 1997 to February 01, 1997 location: N: -74.0157 S: -78.0318 W: 168.9717 E: -176.0278 project/cruise: AESOPS/NBP-97-1 - Ross Sea Process 2 Cruise ship: R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Methodology

NBP-97-03

Website
Platform
RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer
Report
Start Date
1997-04-04
End Date
1997-05-11
Description
Ross Sea Process Study 3

Acquisition Description
PI: David Caron (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) and Darcy Lonsdale (State University of New York, Stony Brook) dataset: Microplankton grazing; herbivory dates: April 15, 1997 to April 29, 1997 location: N: -73.9658 S: -77.9962 W: 168.8644 E: -176.0121 project/cruise: AESOPS/NBP-97-3 - Ross Sea Process 3 Cruise ship: R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Methodology

NBP-97-08

Website
Platform
RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer
Report
Start Date
1997-11-05
End Date
1997-12-13
Description
Ross Sea Process Study 4 SeaWiFS transmits images to U.S. JGOFS scientists aboard the Palmer, for first time on November 23, 1997.

Acquisition Description
PI: David Caron (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) and Darcy Lonsdale (State University of New York, Stony Brook) dataset: Microplankton grazing; herbivory dates: November 15, 1997 to December 07, 1997 location: N: -73.5048 S: -76.6262 W: 169.1260 E: -177.9980 project/cruise: AESOPS/NBP-97-8 - Ross Sea Process 4 Cruise ship: R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Methodology


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Project Information

U.S. JGOFS Antarctic Environment and Southern Ocean Process Study (AESOPS)


Coverage: Southern Ocean, Ross Sea


The U.S. Southern Ocean JGOFS program, called Antarctic Environment and Southern Ocean Process Study (AESOPS), began in August 1996 and continued through March 1998. The U.S. JGOFS AESOPS program focused on two regions in the Southern Ocean: an east/west section of the Ross-Sea continental shelf along 76.5°S, and a second north/south section of the Southern Ocean spanning the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) at ~170°W (identified as the Polar Front). The science program, coordinated by Antarctic Support Associates (ASA), comprised eleven cruises using the R.V.I.B Nathaniel B. Palmer and R/V Roger Revelle as observational platforms and for deployment and recovery of instrumented moorings and sediment-trap arrays. The Ross-Sea region was occupied on six occasions and the Polar Front five times. Mapping data were obtained from SeaSoar, ADCP, and bathymetric systems. Satellite coverage was provided by the NASA SeaWiFS and the NOAA/NASA Pathfinder programs.



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Program Information

U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS)


Coverage: Global


The United States Joint Global Ocean Flux Study was a national component of international JGOFS and an integral part of global climate change research.

The U.S. launched the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) in the late 1980s to study the ocean carbon cycle. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. As we studied ocean biogeochemistry, we learned that our simple views of carbon uptake and transport were severely limited, and a new "wave" of ocean science was born. U.S. JGOFS has been supported primarily by the U.S. National Science Foundation in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of Energy and the Office of Naval Research. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP).



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