Leaf morphometrics data from Virginia Aquarium Climate Change Facility, Virginia Beach VA; 2011-2015 (Impact of Climate on Eelgrass project)

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/505012
Version: 13 March 2015
Version Date: 2015-03-13

Project
» Impact of Climate Warming and Ocean Carbonation on Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) (Impact of Climate on Eelgrass)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Zimmerman, Richard C.Old Dominion University (ODU)Principal Investigator, Contact
Hill, Victoria J.Old Dominion University (ODU)Co-Principal Investigator
Swingle, W. MarkVirginia AquariumCo-Principal Investigator
Ruble, DavidOld Dominion University (ODU)Contact
Gegg, Stephen R.Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager


Dataset Description

Eelgrass Climate Impacts
Experimental conditions, growth and survival of eelgrass
Leaf morphometric data measured on 3 to 5 shoots in each tank
Experiment codes refer to specific populations and plantings:
 

Experiment Code

Start Date

Population

1

May 2013

South Bay, Virginia Transplants

2

April 2013

Dumas Bay, Washington

3

4

April 2013

April 2013

Nisqually Landing, Washington

False Bay, Washington (seeds)

5

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14-21

April 2013

December 2013

May 2014

May 2014

May 2014

May 2014

May 2014

May 2014

May 2014

South Bay, VA nutrient manipulations

South Bay, Virginia (re-planting)

Dumas Bay, Washington

Nisqually Landing, Washington

South Bay, Virginia

South Bay, VA nutrient manipulations (whole)

South Bay, Virginia (pH 6.5 re-planting)

South Bay, VA (DOC)

South Bay, VA nutrient manipulations (NE)


Acquisition Description

Leaf morphometric data were measured on 3 to 5 shoots in each tank once each month beginning in May 2013. The total length of each leaf on a shoot was measured to the nearest mm using a flexible meter tape. Widths were measured with a digital caliper. Experiment codes refer to specific populations and plantings:

Experiment Code

Start Date

Population

1

May 2013

South Bay, Virginia Transplants

2

April 2013

Dumas Bay, Washington

3

4

April 2013

April 2013

Nisqually Landing, Washington

False Bay, Washington (seeds)

5

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14-21

April 2013

December 2013

May 2014

May 2014

May 2014

May 2014

May 2014

May 2014

May 2014

South Bay, VA nutrient manipulations

South Bay, Virginia (re-planting)

Dumas Bay, Washington

Nisqually Landing, Washington

South Bay, Virginia

South Bay, VA nutrient manipulations (whole)

South Bay, Virginia (pH 6.5 re-planting)

South Bay, VA (DOC)

South Bay, VA nutrient manipulations (NE)


Processing Description

Leaf morphometrics - Growth rates were determined using the hole-punch method. Growth rates were determined by measuring (1) the total length of each leaf on each shoot and (2) the distance from the original punch mark on the outer sheath to the existing hole on each leaf (Zieman and Wetzel 1980, Zimmerman et al. 1996). Replicate measures within each tank were averaged to produce single values for each experiment code.

BCO-DMO Processing Notes
- Generated from original file: "BORG_SeaGrass_Full_data_Records.xlsx" Sheet: "Growth_Rates" contributed by David Ruble
- Approx Lat/Lon of Virginia Aquarium Climate Change Facility appended to enable data discovery in MapServer
- Parameters modified to conform to BCO-DMO parameter naming conventions (Choosing a Parameter Name)


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Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
Lab_IdLab Id – Lab identifier where experiments were conducted text
LatApproximate Latitude Position of Lab; South is negative decimal degrees
LonApproximate Longitude Position of Lab; West is negative decimal degrees
dateDate yyyymmdd
Experiment_CodeExperiment Code – Populations and Plantings (see Dataset Description and Acquisition Description for Experiment Code key) dimensionless
TankTank dimensionless
pH_TargetpH Target pH
Leaf_WidthLeaf Width mm
Leaf_Length_NewLeaf Length New cm
Leaf_Length_TotalLeaf Length Total cm
Shoot_SizeShoot Size cm^2
Growth_Rate_LengthGrowth Rate Length cm/d
Growth_Rate_AreaGrowth Rate Area cm^2/d
Growth_Rate_Day_RateGrowth Rate Day Rate 1/d

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Deployments

lab_Virginia_Aquarium_Climate_Change_Facility

Website
Platform
Virginia Aquarium Climate Change Facility
Start Date
2011-02-01
End Date
2015-01-31
Description
Laboratory experiments conducted from 1 May 2013 to 31 Jan 2013 at Virginia Aquarium Climate Change Facility, Virginia Beach VA


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Project Information

Impact of Climate Warming and Ocean Carbonation on Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) (Impact of Climate on Eelgrass)


Coverage: Virginia Beach, VA and Southern Chesapeake Bay region 36° 49’ 32.84” N 75° 58’ 58.17” W


Project abstract from the NSF proposal:
The past few decades have accumulated mounting evidence of profound anthropogenic effects on fundamental biogeochemical processes across the planet, especially in coastal environments that support a diverse array of highly productive ecosystems including coral reefs, seagrass meadows, and estuaries. The ecological significance of seagrasses is largely due to the remarkable degree of adaptation they exhibit to a submerged aquatic existence. Despite numerous successful adaptations, however, seagrasses have high light requirements that make them vulnerable to anthropogenic disturbances. The paradoxical vulnerability results largely from their high reliance on dissolved aqueous CO2 for photosynthesis. The potential for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations to have significant warming impacts on the global climate has long been recognized, but the potential impacts of the "other CO2 problem", also known as ocean acidification, have only recently begun to be appreciated. As with other impacts of climate change, the increased concentrations of dissolved aqueous CO2 [CO2 (aq)] in the oceans of the world will elicit both negative and positive responses among organisms, ultimately potentiating ecological losers and winners. This project will explore the response of eelgrass to increased CO2 (aq) within the context of a warming coastal ocean using a combination of manipulative experiments, physiological/biochemical investigations and mathematical modeling. The investigators hypothesize that rising CO2(aq) will increase the high temperature tolerance of plants by improving the Q10 response of photosynthesis relative to respiration, thereby leading to higher growth rates, improved survival of vegetative shoots at high temperature, and even flowering output and seed production. This project will investigate the key relationships between environmental parameters that have both negative (ocean warming) and positive (ocean carbonation) impacts on the light requirements and dynamics of carbon balance in these critically important marine angiosperms. By focusing on Chesapeake populations growing near the southern limit of eelgrass distribution on the Atlantic coast, the investigators will gain predictive insight into how climate change may alter the geographic distribution of this critically important species in other coastal environments that may be subjected to less temperature stress but similar levels of ocean carbonation.

Objectives: The overall goal of the proposed research will be to develop a predictive mechanistic understanding of the simultaneous impacts of water temperature, [CO2(aq)] and [HCO3-] on the photosynthetic metabolism, vegetative growth and reproductive success of Zostera marina L. We will address the following questions, (1) To what extent is the upper thermal limit of eelgrass controlled by CO2(aq) availability, (2) Will prolonged CO2(aq) enrichment affect the ability of eelgrass to utilize HCO3- for photosynthesis, (3) Does prolonged CO2(aq) enrichment increase seed production and viability, and (4) Does CO2(aq) enrichment affect nutritional quality of seagrass tissue, particularly C:N ratios and protein content?

These experiments will be carried out at an experimental CO2(aq) enrichment facility which is being constructed at the Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center, adjacent to Owl Creek and Rudee Inlet, in Virginia Beach, VA.

Data Inventory

1) Weather and hydrographic data for Owl Creek Experimental Facility. Metadata and time series observations of irradiance, water temperature, pH, salinity, alkalinity, CO2 and dissolved nutrients will be posted on our web site, and final version data will be supplied to NODC for permanent archive.
2) Experimental metadata from the tanks (pH, temperature, eelgrass abundance and survival, growth rates, metabolic rates, etc.) will also be posted on our website listed above. Final data will be supplied to NODC and/or other databases as appropriate and as they become available.

Project data will also be contributed to thematic databases, including SeaBASS operated by NASA, WOOD operated by ONR, as well as NODC.

Preliminary results may be posted at the group's Web site hosted at ODU:
http://sci.odu.edu/oceanography/directory/faculty/zimmerman/researchpage/index.shtml



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Funding

Funding SourceAward
NSF Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE)

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