pH (total hydrogen scale) data recorded from 2018-2020 from a sensor array that measures pH, pCO2, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, turbidity, and current velocity at Friday Harbor Laboratories Ocean Observatory (FHLOO)

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/811757
Data Type: Other Field Results
Version: 1
Version Date: 2020-05-19

Project
» FSML: Instrumentation at UW Friday Harbor Laboratories for Studies of the Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification and Ocean Change (FHLOO)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Sebens, KennethUniversity of Washington (FHL)Principal Investigator
Carrington, EmilyUniversity of Washington (FHL)Co-Principal Investigator, Contact
Gagnon, AlexanderUniversity of Washington (UW)Co-Principal Investigator
Grunbaum, DanielUniversity of Washington (UW)Co-Principal Investigator
Lessard, Evelyn J.University of Washington (UW)Co-Principal Investigator
Newton, JanUniversity of Washington (UW)Co-Principal Investigator
Swalla, BillieUniversity of Washington (UW)Co-Principal Investigator
Crosby, J. DylanUniversity of Washington (UW)Contact
Kull, KristyUniversity of Washington (UW)Contact
Sato, KirkUniversity of Washington (UW)Contact
Rauch, ShannonWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager

Abstract
pH (total hydrogen scale) and temperature recorded from 2018-2020 from a sensor array that measures pH, pCO2, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, turbidity, and current velocity at Friday Harbor Laboratories Ocean Observatory (FHLOO).


Coverage

Spatial Extent: Lat:48.5461 Lon:-123.007
Temporal Extent: 2018-01-31 - 2020-05-05

Dataset Description

pH (total hydrogen scale) and temperature recorded from 2018-2020 from a sensor array that measures pH, pCO2, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, turbidity, and current velocity at Friday Harbor Laboratories Ocean Observatory (FHLOO).


Acquisition Description

Data are collected from a Sunburst SAMI-pH deployed at a floating dock at ~2-3 m water depth located at the University of Washington Friday Harbor Laboratories, Friday Harbor, WA (Lat = 48.5461, Long = -123.007). This dataset contains values of pH and water temperature.


Processing Description

BCO-DMO Processing:
- concatenated separate data files (.txt) into one;
- added ISO 8601 date/time format;
- added latitude and longitude as columns; values originally provided in dataset metadata.


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Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
DateDate (UTC); format: MM/DD/YY unitless
Time_UTCTime (UTC); format: hh:mm AM/PM unitless
Time_PSTTime (local time zone, PST/PDT); format: hh:mm AM/PM unitless
Sea_pHSeawater pH seawater pH units (total hydrogen scale)
Sea_TempWater temperature degrees Celsius
ISO_DateTime_UTCDate and time (UTC) formatted to ISO 8601 standard; format: yyyy-mm-ddTHH:MMZ unitless
LatitudeLatitude of sampling location degrees North
LongitudeLongitude of sampling location (negative = west) degrees East
orig_file_nameOriginal file name unitless


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Instruments

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Sunburst SAMI-pH
Generic Instrument Name
Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument
Dataset-specific Description
Sunburst SAMI-pH (pH and temperature)
Generic Instrument Description
The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument (SAMI) measures and logs levels of dissolved chemicals in sea and fresh water. It is a plastic cylinder about 6 inches wide and 2 feet long that is self-powered and capable of hourly measurements for up to one year. All data collected are logged to an internal memory chip to be downloaded later. SAMI sensors usually are placed a few feet underwater on permanent moorings, while others on floating drifters sample the water wherever the wind and currents carry them. The instruments have been used by researchers around the globe in a variety of studies since 1999. Dr. Mike DeGrandpre, University of Montana, developed the SAMI between 1990 and 1993 during his postdoctoral work at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (Woods Hole, MA, USA). For additional information, see URL: http://www.sunburstsensors.com/ from the manufacturer, Sunburst Sensors, LLC, 1226 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802.


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Deployments

FHLOO

Website
Platform
Friday_Harbor
Description
Friday Harbor Laboratories Ocean Observatory (FHLOO) located at the University of Washington Friday Harbor Laboratories, Friday Harbor WA. Data are collected from an array of sensors from a floating dock at ~2-3 m water depth. Lat = 48.5461    Long = -123.007


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Project Information

FSML: Instrumentation at UW Friday Harbor Laboratories for Studies of the Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification and Ocean Change (FHLOO)

Coverage: University of Washington Friday Harbor Laboratories, Friday Harbor WA


Ocean change, including ocean acidification (OA), poses an unprecedented threat to oceanic and coastal ecosystems and to the societies that depend on them. The scale and complexity of the OA problem requires new spatially distributed data collection, and an integrated programmatic approach to OA research. The Salish Sea region, fed by waters of the Northeast Pacific, is particularly vulnerable to OA events associated with ocean upwelling and is already experiencing pH ranges that other areas will not see for many decades; commercial fisheries and shellfish aquaculture already appear to be affected or at risk. OA is further complicated in estuaries such as the Salish Sea by local processes including respiration, production, anoxia, and mixing, resulting in wide pH and pCO2 variation in time and space. Long-range plans for ocean change research at FHL focus on integrated ocean carbonate system observations, utilizing new advances in the development of ocean sensors and instruments, and incorporating biological response studies under laboratory and field conditions. Field conditions will be simulated using environmental and ecosystem modeling studies, and our findings will provide information for assessment of policy, and socio-economic responses. Societal needs will be fully integrated with our research, merging the relevance of the problem and the need for human adaptation to OA. FHL will engage in knowledge transfer, with data and information flowing to and from policy makers, affected communities, scientists, and the general public. The shellfish aquaculture community will benefit economically from the new data and tribal governments will accrue benefits that could help sustain traditional food sources. The public will benefit through targeted education activities that improve general understanding of ocean processes and especially ocean acidification. UW and FHL will train a workforce that is ready to discover and deal with the impacts of OA and to realize adaptive responses that will allow affected industries and communities to thrive in the presence of this threat. Users include groups engaged in marine resource-based economies, members of coastal tribes, managers of marine resources, researchers in academic and government laboratories, and both formal and informal educators. FHL education programs reach broadly, from high school teachers and their students to undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral researchers. At the graduate level, FHL will prepare students for careers inside and outside of academia. Under represented minorities (URM) are fully integrated into FHL activities, with the objective of increasing their representation in oceanography, biology, fisheries and other OA and ocean-related fields. We will leverage existing programs (UW IGERT in Ocean Change, FHL Blinks and REU site programs, FHL Research Apprenticeships, NSF BEACON at UW) and create new programs to recruit, mentor, and prepare a community of URM students both on and off the university campus. We will expand our ongoing engagement of Native American students in ocean change research and education, near their own college campus (NWIC) and with their own instructors, in a culturally respectful way.


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Funding

Funding SourceAward
NSF Division of Biological Infrastructure (NSF DBI)

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