Processed CTD data (binned) and station information for the PE21-18 Microbial DO respir cruise (15 total casts) aboard the R/V Pelican during April and May 2021.

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/859606
Data Type: Cruise Results
Version: 1
Version Date: 2021-11-08

Project
» CAREER: Who’s sucking all the oxygen out of the room? Investigating aerobic microbial respiration dynamics in coastal hypoxia. (Coastal O2 Respir)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Thrash, J. CameronUniversity of Southern California (USC)Principal Investigator, Contact
Soenen, KarenWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager

Abstract
Processed CTD data (binned) and station information for the PE21-18 Microbial DO respir cruise (15 total casts) aboard the R/V Pelican during April and May 2021.


Coverage

Spatial Extent: N:28.8701 E:-90.4883 S:28.6074 W:-90.62202
Temporal Extent: 2021-04-27 - 2021-05-02

Acquisition Description

Fifteen CTD casts were taken during the PE21-18 cruise at 5 stations. The planned stations had the following location and depth:

Station: Lat, Long, Depth (m)
C6C: 28.8686, -90.4903, 19.2
D2: 28.8417, -90.8333, 15.6
D4: 28.6083, -90.8333, 19.1
E3: 28.6583, -91.25, 22
F4: 28.7833, -91.6167, 24.2

The data was collected using a SeaBird 911 plus system with 12-12 liter Niskin bottles. The instruments included in the 911 plus suite are dual Temperature (SBE 3), dual Conductivity (SBE 4), and dual Oxygen (SBE 43) sensors. Additionally, the suite included an SBE 27 pH/Oxidation, Chelsea Aquatracka 3 Chl_a, and a Wetlabs CDOM. Serial numbers and calibration information is stored in the Header Information included in the .cnv files.


Processing Description

The data was processed using Seabird's SBEDataProccessing_Win32 software. The data was converted from hexadecimal to engineering units first. Using the software’s Bin Averaging tool it was also averaged in bins of 0.5meters. 


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Supplemental Files

File
PE21-18 cruise plan
filename: Cruise_Plan_Apr2021.pdf
(Portable Document Format (.pdf), 1.25 MB)
MD5:3e2aa0496a8b74aaf96af059ee825ce5
Cruise plan for PE21-18 cruise with cruise tracks, dates, science operation descriptions and schematics.
PE21-18 navigation plot
filename: nav_plot_all_topo.png
(Portable Network Graphics (.png), 12.98 KB)
MD5:27c079463466eb83b67cd631892e561a
PE21-18 navigation plot
PE21-18_binned_CTD
filename: PE21-18_binned_CTD.zip
(ZIP Archive (ZIP), 94.16 KB)
MD5:6aadc7e9eee5ee7ba3312e4b773b2eed
Original Seabird CTD files (.cnv) for the dataset 859606, version 1. Sensor serial numbers and calibration information is store in the header information section.

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Related Datasets

IsDerivedFrom
Thrash, J. C. (2021) Processed CTD data (unbinned) and station information for the PE21-18 Microbial DO respir cruise (15 total casts) aboard the R/V Pelican during April and May 2021. Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). (Version 1) Version Date 2021-11-08 doi:10.26008/1912/bco-dmo.859612.1 [view at BCO-DMO]
Relationship Description: The binned ctd dataset (859606) is derived from the unbinned ctd dataset (859612). The binned dataset was averaged in bins of 0.5 meters.

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Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
cruiseCruise identifier unitless
stationStation identifier unitless
cast_numberCTD Cast number unitless
latitudeLatitude, south is negative decimal degrees
longitudeLongitude, west is negative decimal degrees
ISO_DateTime_UTCCast date and time (UTC) in ISO 8601 format yyyy-mm-ddTHH:MM:SSZ unitless
depSMDepth m
t090CTemperature degrees Celsius (°C)
t190CTemperature degrees Celsius (°C)
c0mS_cmConductivity mS/cm
c1mS_cmConductivity mS/cm
sal00Salinity PSU
sal11Salinity PSU
sbeox0Mg_LOxygen mg/l
sbeox1Mg_LOxygent mg/l
flCFluoresence ug/l
wetCDOMFluoresence ug/l
phpH unitless
orpOxydation reduction potential mV
flagflag unitless
filefile unitless


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Instruments

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
12-12 liter Niskin bottles
Generic Instrument Name
Niskin bottle
Dataset-specific Description
The data was collected using a SeaBird 911 plus system with 12-12 liter Niskin bottles. The instruments included in the 911 plus suite are dual Temperature (SBE 3), dual Conductivity (SBE 4), and dual Oxygen (SBE 43) sensors. Additionally, the suite included an SBE 27 pH/Oxidation, Chelsea Aquatracka 3 Chl_a, and a Wetlabs CDOM. Serial numbers and calibration information is stored in the Header Information included in the .cnv files.
Generic Instrument Description
A Niskin bottle (a next generation water sampler based on the Nansen bottle) is a cylindrical, non-metallic water collection device with stoppers at both ends. The bottles can be attached individually on a hydrowire or deployed in 12, 24, or 36 bottle Rosette systems mounted on a frame and combined with a CTD. Niskin bottles are used to collect discrete water samples for a range of measurements including pigments, nutrients, plankton, etc.

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
dual Temperature (SBE 3) sensor
Generic Instrument Name
Sea-Bird SBE-3 Temperature Sensor
Dataset-specific Description
The data was collected using a SeaBird 911 plus system with 12-12 liter Niskin bottles. The instruments included in the 911 plus suite are dual Temperature (SBE 3), dual Conductivity (SBE 4), and dual Oxygen (SBE 43) sensors. Additionally, the suite included an SBE 27 pH/Oxidation, Chelsea Aquatracka 3 Chl_a, and a Wetlabs CDOM. Serial numbers and calibration information is stored in the Header Information included in the .cnv files.
Generic Instrument Description
The SBE-3 is a slow response, frequency output temperature sensor manufactured by Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc. (Bellevue, Washington, USA). It has an initial accuracy of +/- 0.001 degrees Celsius with a stability of +/- 0.002 degrees Celsius per year and measures seawater temperature in the range of -5.0 to +35 degrees Celsius. more information from Sea-Bird Electronics

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
dual Conductivity (SBE 4) sensor
Generic Instrument Name
Sea-Bird SBE-4 Conductivity Sensor
Dataset-specific Description
The data was collected using a SeaBird 911 plus system with 12-12 liter Niskin bottles. The instruments included in the 911 plus suite are dual Temperature (SBE 3), dual Conductivity (SBE 4), and dual Oxygen (SBE 43) sensors. Additionally, the suite included an SBE 27 pH/Oxidation, Chelsea Aquatracka 3 Chl_a, and a Wetlabs CDOM. Serial numbers and calibration information is stored in the Header Information included in the .cnv files.
Generic Instrument Description
The Sea-Bird SBE-4 conductivity sensor is a modular, self-contained instrument that measures conductivity from 0 to 7 Siemens/meter. The sensors (Version 2; S/N 2000 and higher) have electrically isolated power circuits and optically coupled outputs to eliminate any possibility of noise and corrosion caused by ground loops. The sensing element is a cylindrical, flow-through, borosilicate glass cell with three internal platinum electrodes. Because the outer electrodes are connected together, electric fields are confined inside the cell, making the measured resistance (and instrument calibration) independent of calibration bath size or proximity to protective cages or other objects.

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Wetlabs CDOM
Generic Instrument Name
Fluorometer
Generic Instrument Description
A fluorometer or fluorimeter is a device used to measure parameters of fluorescence: its intensity and wavelength distribution of emission spectrum after excitation by a certain spectrum of light. The instrument is designed to measure the amount of stimulated electromagnetic radiation produced by pulses of electromagnetic radiation emitted into a water sample or in situ.

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
dual Oxygen sensor
Generic Instrument Name
Sea-Bird SBE 43 Dissolved Oxygen Sensor
Dataset-specific Description
The data was collected using a SeaBird 911 plus system with 12-12 liter Niskin bottles. The instruments included in the 911 plus suite are dual Temperature (SBE 3), dual Conductivity (SBE 4), and dual Oxygen (SBE 43) sensors. Additionally, the suite included an SBE 27 pH/Oxidation, Chelsea Aquatracka 3 Chl_a, and a Wetlabs CDOM. Serial numbers and calibration information is stored in the Header Information included in the .cnv files.
Generic Instrument Description
The Sea-Bird SBE 43 dissolved oxygen sensor is a redesign of the Clark polarographic membrane type of dissolved oxygen sensors. more information from Sea-Bird Electronics

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
SeaBird 911 plus system
Generic Instrument Name
CTD Sea-Bird SBE 911plus
Dataset-specific Description
The data was collected using a SeaBird 911 plus system with 12-12 liter Niskin bottles. The instruments included in the 911 plus suite are dual Temperature (SBE 3), dual Conductivity (SBE 4), and dual Oxygen (SBE 43) sensors. Additionally, the suite included an SBE 27 pH/Oxidation, Chelsea Aquatracka 3 Chl_a, and a Wetlabs CDOM.
Generic Instrument Description
The Sea-Bird SBE 911plus is a type of CTD instrument package for continuous measurement of conductivity, temperature and pressure. The SBE 911plus includes the SBE 9plus Underwater Unit and the SBE 11plus Deck Unit (for real-time readout using conductive wire) for deployment from a vessel. The combination of the SBE 9plus and SBE 11plus is called a SBE 911plus. The SBE 9plus uses Sea-Bird's standard modular temperature and conductivity sensors (SBE 3plus and SBE 4). The SBE 9plus CTD can be configured with up to eight auxiliary sensors to measure other parameters including dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, fluorescence, light (PAR), light transmission, etc.). more information from Sea-Bird Electronics

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Chelsea Aquatracka 3 Chl_a
Generic Instrument Name
Turbidity Meter
Generic Instrument Description
A turbidity meter measures the clarity of a water sample. A beam of light is shown through a water sample. The turbidity, or its converse clarity, is read on a numerical scale. Turbidity determined by this technique is referred to as the nephelometric method from the root meaning "cloudiness". This word is used to form the name of the unit of turbidity, the NTU (Nephelometric Turbidity Unit). The meter reading cannot be used to compare the turbidity of different water samples unless the instrument is calibrated. Description from: http://www.gvsu.edu/wri/education/instructor-s-manual-turbidity-10.htm (One example is the Orion AQ4500 Turbidimeter)

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
SBE 27 pH/Oxidation
Generic Instrument Name
Sea-Bird SBE 27 pH/O.R.P. sensor
Generic Instrument Description
The SBE 27 pH and O.R.P. (Redox) sensor combines a pressure-balanced, glass-electrode, Ag/AgCl reference probe and platinum O.R.P. electrode to provide in-situ measurements at depths to 1200 m. The replaceable pH probe is permanently sealed and is supplied with a soaker bottle attachment that prevents the reference electrode from drying out during storage. The SBE 27 is intended for use as an add-on auxiliary sensor for profiling CTDs (SBE 9plus; SBE 19, 19plus, and 19plus V2 SeaCAT; and SBE 25 and 25plus Sealogger).


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Deployments

PE21-18

Website
Platform
R/V Pelican
Start Date
2021-04-27
End Date
2021-05-02


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Project Information

CAREER: Who’s sucking all the oxygen out of the room? Investigating aerobic microbial respiration dynamics in coastal hypoxia. (Coastal O2 Respir)

Coverage: Northern Gulf of Mexico, Southern California Bight


NSF Award Abstract:
Decreasing marine dissolved oxygen (DO) is a widespread and growing global problem. Among the chief causes for coastal losses of DO are anthropogenic nutrient inputs that lead to seasonal hypoxia- DO concentrations below 2 mg/L. Microorganisms are the primary agents of oxygen removal, and although we have a basic mechanistic understanding of how nutrient enrichment combines with stratification to stimulate microbial metabolism and oxygen drawdown, we still do not know which microorganisms are ultimately responsible for oxygen consumption leading to, and during, coastal hypoxia in any particular region. Nor do we know the extent to which each hypoxic system arises from universal microbial mechanisms or whether there may be unique microorganisms and metabolic pathways involved in each locale. Hypoxic regions are increasing in number and size around the globe, amplifying the need to better understand the microbial processes responsible for oxygen consumption. In response, the project pursues an integrated research and education effort to study the microbial mechanisms of oxygen respiration in two coastal zones where DO depletion occurs: the northern Gulf of Mexico ?dead zone?, and the Southern California Bight. This work identifies the microorganism actively consuming oxygen in these systems, what fuels them, and whether/how those taxa respond to environmental changes. The investigators are generating microbial DO consumption rate, genetic, and taxonomic data critical to better constraining respiration models focused on water column DO depletion. In doing so, hundreds of undergraduate and students and dozens of high school STEM teachers contribute valuable data by participating in modern marine microbiological research. The project also improves integration of authentic research experiences into college and high-school classrooms in the context of a problem of global relevance.

Regions of low DO take multiple forms, from vast open ocean oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) which hover in the upper water column, to shallower coastal zones of bottom water hypoxia fueled by close proximity to fluvial inputs of human supplied nutrients. Microbial respiration is primarily responsible for the ultimate consumption of DO, and therefore understanding the microorganisms that inhabit these systems and their metabolic capabilities is critical for improving our ability to predict the timing, extent, and severity of DO depletion, and how these factors relate to environmental change. While there has been substantial research into the microbiology of OMZs, we know comparatively little about the microbial dynamics, and in particular, the microorganisms responsible for oxygen consumption, in coastal hypoxia. This integrated research and education effort is framed by the following objectives:

1. Determine the microorganisms and metabolic processes responsible for actively respiring water column DO prior to, and during, hypoxia.

2. Quantify microbial respiration rates for communities and representative water column species in both the planktonic and particle-associated fractions.

3. Integrate authentic microbiology research on a globally relevant topic into undergraduate and high school classrooms.

The work uses a combination of advanced cultivation-independent and pure culture measurements to discriminate between oxygen consumption by planktonic and particle-associated microbial fractions, as well as by communities at the surface and those in bottom waters, in two different systems of coastal DO depletion (the northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone and the Southern California coastal shelf). Direct assessment of actively respiring taxa are connected with their metabolic potential, gene expression, and respiration rates. This project is determining, for the first time, the taxa actively consuming oxygen in these systems. The results also provide size fractionated respiration rates and bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) with depth across multiple sites and seasons, and importantly, also yield cell-specific respiration rates and BGE for active taxa within these systems. This data will constrain variable respiration across differing environmental conditions. The investigators are experimentally testing how alterations in environmental variables affect these respiration rates and BGEs, leading to greater predictive insight for the range of effects climate forcing will have on DO consumption. This information also facilitates comparisons between multiple marine systems to identify whether common or distinct organisms and metabolic processes are operating to remove DO.

This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.



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Funding

Funding SourceAward
NSF Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE)

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