Suspended PIC, PC, PN data collected along a North Pacific transect between Hawaii and Alaska on R/V Kilo Moana cruise KM1712 in August 2017

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/860409
Data Type: Cruise Results
Version: 1
Version Date: 2021-09-21

Project
» Ocean Acidification - Collaborative Research: Measuring the kinetics of CaCO3 dissolution in seawater using novel isotope labeling, laboratory experiments, and in situ experiments (CaCO3 dissolution)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Berelson, William M.University of Southern California (USC)Lead Principal Investigator
Adkins, Jess F.California Institute of Technology (Caltech)Principal Investigator
Dong, SijiaCalifornia Institute of Technology (Caltech)Scientist, Contact
Rollins, Nick E.University of Southern California (USC)Scientist
Subhas, Adam V.Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)Scientist
Gerlach, Dana StuartWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager

Abstract
This dataset includes general measurements for in situ pump casts at 5 stations on a transect between Hawaii and Alaska. Data was collected in August 2017 onboard R/V Kilo Moana cruise KM1712.


Coverage

Spatial Extent: N:50 E:-148 S:23 W:-158
Temporal Extent: 2017-08-02 - 2017-08-24

Dataset Description

North Pacific, 150 W, 20 to 60 N, all depths


Acquisition Description

Suspended particles were collected at 5 different stations along a North Pacific transect between Hawaii and Alaska. Samples were collected on 142 mm diameter Glass Fiber Filters (GFF) using McLane Pumps. Particulate Inorganic Carbon (PIC) content was measured by acidifying a subsample of the GFF filter and measuring total CO2 released on a Picarro gas concentration analyzer. Total Particulate Carbon (PC) and Particulate Nitrogen (PN) were analyzed by burning a subsample of the GFF on an Elemental Analyzer (EA).


Processing Description

BCO-DMO processing:
- Converted latitude and longitude to decimal degrees.
- Created column for ISO 8601 formatted times (UTC/GMT timezone)
- Rounded column values to submitter preference
- Modified parameter (column) names to conform with BCO-DMO naming conventions. 
      No spaces, hyphens, commas, parentheses, or Greek letters. 
      The only chararacters allowed are A-Z, a-z, 0-9, and underscores.

 


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Related Publications

Dong, S., Berelson, W. M., Rollins, N. E., Subhas, A. V., Naviaux, J. D., Celestian, A. J., Liu, X., Turaga, N., Kemnitz, N. J., Byrne, R. H., & Adkins, J. F. (2019). Aragonite dissolution kinetics and calcite/aragonite ratios in sinking and suspended particles in the North Pacific. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 515, 1–12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2019.03.016
Methods
Results

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Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
Cruise_IDCruise identifier unitless
Cruise_synonymCruise name unitless
StationStation number unitless
LongitudeLongitude of sample collection (West is negative) decimal degrees
LatitudeLatitude of sample collection decimal degrees
DepthDepth of sample collection meters (m)
Deploy_Time_localTime of pump deployment (local, Hawaii Standard Time) unitless
Recover_Time_localTime of pump recovery (local, Hawaii Standard Time) unitless
d13CDelta 13C of particulate carbon per mil
PCConcentration of total particulate carbon micrograms per liter (ug/L)
d15NDelta 15N of particulate nitrogen versus air per mil
PNConcentration of total particulate nitrogen micrograms per liter (ug/L)
PIC_POC_ratioRatio of particulate inorganic carbon to particulate organic carbon unitless
Deploy_DateTime_UTCTime of pump deployment in ISO8601 format unitless
Recover_DateTime_UTCTime of pump recovery in ISO8601 format unitless


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Instruments

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
McLane Pump
Generic Instrument Name
McLane Pump
Dataset-specific Description
Samples were collected on Glass Fiber Filters using Mclane Pumps
Generic Instrument Description
McLane pumps sample large volumes of seawater at depth. They are attached to a wire and lowered to different depths in the ocean. As the water is pumped through the filter, particles suspended in the ocean are collected on the filters. The pumps are then retrieved and the contents of the filters are analyzed in a lab.

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Picarro Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Gas Analyzer (G2131-i)
Generic Instrument Name
CO2 Analyzer
Dataset-specific Description
Particulate Inorganic Carbon (PIC) content was measured by acidifying a subsample of the GFF filter and measuring total CO2 released on Picarro
Generic Instrument Description
Measures atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration.

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Costech ECS4010 CHNSO Elemental Analyzer
Generic Instrument Name
Elemental Analyzer
Dataset-specific Description
Total Particulate Carbon (PC) and Particulate Nitrogen (PN) were analyzed by burning a subsample of the GFF on Elemental Analyzer (EA).   
Generic Instrument Description
Instruments that quantify carbon, nitrogen and sometimes other elements by combusting the sample at very high temperature and assaying the resulting gaseous oxides. Usually used for samples including organic material.

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Picarro Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Gas Analyzer (G2131-i)
Generic Instrument Name
Cavity enhanced absorption spectrometers
Dataset-specific Description
Particulate Inorganic Carbon (PIC) content was measured by acidifying a subsample of the GFF filter and measuring total CO2 released on Picarro
Generic Instrument Description
Instruments that illuminate a sample inside an optical cavity, typically using laser light, and measure the concentration or amount of a species in gas phase by absorption spectroscopy. Techniques include cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS).


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Deployments

KM1712

Website
Platform
R/V Kilo Moana
Start Date
2017-08-01
End Date
2017-09-01
Description
Additional cruise information is available from the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R): https://www.rvdata.us/search/cruise/KM1712


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Project Information

Ocean Acidification - Collaborative Research: Measuring the kinetics of CaCO3 dissolution in seawater using novel isotope labeling, laboratory experiments, and in situ experiments (CaCO3 dissolution)

Coverage: North Pacific, 150 W, 20 to 60 N, all depths


NSF Award Abstract:
Ocean acidification by anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to the atmosphere will ultimately be balanced by sedimentary carbonate dissolution. The time constant for this reaction, however, is ca. 6,000 years. So, in the coming decades, the ocean's response to CO2 uptake will be based on the kinetics of supply and removal, not on the thermodynamics of the system. Unfortunately our understanding of the basic rate law for carbonate dissolution in the ocean is lacking. The order of the rate law is still argued to be anywhere from 1 to 4.5; this range represents a major difference in the sensitivity of the system to small changes in saturation state. The relative importance of aragonite vs. calcite dissolution, the influence of magnesium content in the minerals, and the sign of the role of organic matter are all still unknowns in the modern ocean. Of course, a truly useful rate law would be able to combine the relative importance of all of these factors into a predictive rule for how dissolution will respond to ocean acidification.

In this study, researchers at the California Institute of Technology and the University of Southern California will address this problem with a novel set of laboratory and in situ experiments that use carbon-13 (13C) tracer labeled biogenic carbonates to measure the dissolution rate under a wide range of saturation states. They will assemble a set of rules that will govern carbonate dissolution in sinking particles and in marine sediments. This will require two sub-projects. First, they will culture several different species of biogenic carbonate producers in the lab under the influence of a strong 13C label. With enrichments of around 30,000o/oo in the calcium carbonate (CaCO3), they will measure the change in dissolved inorganic carbon-13 at several time points over 1-2 weeks in specially built high-pressure reaction chambers. The construction of a prototype chamber is completed and it provides the means, for the first time, to control carbonate saturation state by changing seawater chemistry, pressure, and temperature independently. Experiments with pure 13C labeled inorganic CaCO3 will provide the inorganic reference frame for the biogenic carbonate results. Secondly, to check the lab-based rate data, they will also use labeled biogenic particles in a simple Niskin bottle based reactor that will be deployable on regular hydrowire. The accumulation of 13C in the Niskin dissolved inorganic carbon over 1-2 days will provide an initial rate that is directly comparable to the more extensive laboratory study on the same sorts of materials. Using the San Pedro Basin as a test bed for these in situ experiments will sample a range of saturation states in a series of 3-day cruises. This high-sensitivity approach should allow the team to unpack the various components of carbonate dissolution in seawater under rising CO2 concentrations.

Broader Impacts. Producing a better rate law for carbonate dissolution will have broad implications for the fields of marine chemistry, marine biology, paleoceanography, and for potential societal response to ocean acidification. This rate law sits at the heart of the marine carbonate cycle. In addition, this work will benefit at least two graduate students and promote US-Israel collaborations via the inclusion of Jonathan Erez and his students. The specific involvement of underrepresented high school students in scientific/oceanographic research is built into the efforts of this project as well as ongoing efforts by both PIs to communicate their science to a broad array of non-scientific audiences.



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Funding

Funding SourceAward
NSF Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE)
NSF Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE)

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