Nutrient data from RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer cruises NBP0103, NBP0104, NBP0202, and NBP0204 in the Southern Ocean from 2001-2002 (SOGLOBEC project)

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/2373
Data Type: Cruise Results
Version: 1
Version Date: 2010-01-01

Project
» U.S. GLOBEC Southern Ocean (SOGLOBEC)

Program
» U.S. GLOBal ocean ECosystems dynamics (U.S. GLOBEC)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Fanning, KentUniversity of South Florida (USF)Principal Investigator
Allison, DickyWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager

Abstract
Nutrient data from RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer cruises NBP0103, NBP0104, NBP0202, and NBP0204 in the Southern Ocean from 2001-2002 (SOGLOBEC project)


Coverage

Spatial Extent: N:-64.1347 E:-65.501 S:-70.633 W:-77.7745
Temporal Extent: 2001-04-29 - 2002-09-12

Dataset Description

Nutrients from Bottle Casts

 

Methods

Analytical methods used for silica, phosphate, nitrite, and nitrate follow the recommendations of Gordon et al. (1993) for the WOCE WHP project.

The analytical system we employ is a five-channel Technicon Autoanalyzer II upgraded with new heating baths, proportional pumps, colorimeters, improved optics, and an analog to digital conversion system (New Analyzer Program v. 2.40 by Labtronics, Inc.) This Technicon is designed for shipboard as well as laboratory use.

Silica is determined by forming the heteropoly acid of dissolved orthosilicic acid and ammonium molybdate, reducing it with stannous chloride, and then measuring its optical transmittance.

Phosphate is determined by creating the phosphomolybdate heteropoly acid in much the same way as with the silica method. However, its reducing agent is dihydrazine sulfate, after which its transmittance is also measured. A heating bath is required to maximize the color yield.

Nitrite is determined essentially by the Bendschneider and Robinson (1952) technique in which nitrite is reacted with sulfanilamide (SAN) to form a diazotized derivative that is then reacted with a substituted ethylenediamine compound (NED) to form a rose pink azo dye which is measured colorimetrically.

Nitrate is determined by difference after a separate aliquot of a sample is passed through a Cd reduction column to convert its nitrate to nitrite, followed by the measurement of the "augmented" nitrite concentration using the same method as in the nitrite analysis.

In the analytical ammonia method, ammonium reacts with alkaline phenol and hypochlorite to form indophenolblue. Sodium nitroferricyanide intensifies the blue color formed, which is then measured in a colorimeter of our nutrient-analyzer. Precipitation of calcium and magnesium hydroxides is eliminated by the addition of sodium citrate complexing reagent. A heating bath is required. Our version of this technique is based on modifications of published methods such as the article by F. Koroleff in Grasshoff (1976). These modifications were made at Alpkem (now Astoria-Pacific International, Inc.) and at L.Gordon's nutrient laboratory at Oregon State University.

Data

Nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, ammonia, and silica were measured from every niskin bottle tripped from all hydrocasts on this cruise. All concentrations are reported in micromoles per liter.

References

Gordon, L.I., J.C. Jennings, Jr., A.A. Ross, and J.M. Krest, A Suggested Protocol For Continuous Flow Automated Analysis of Seawater Nutrients, in WOCE Operation Manual, WHP Office Report 90-1, WOCE Report 77 No. 68/91, 1-52, 1993.

Grasshoff, K. 1976. Methods of Seawater Analysis, Verlag Chemie, Weinheim, Germany, and New York, NY, 317 pp.

 

Data Contributed By:
Kent Fanning
Dept. of Marine Science
University of South Florida
140 Seventh Avenue, South
St. Petersburg, FL 33701

phone: 727 553 1594
e-mail: kaf@seas.marine.usf.edu

Last updated January 13, 2006; gfh


Acquisition Description

Nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, ammonia, and silica were measured from every niskin bottle tripped from all hydrocasts on this cruise. All concentrations are reported in micromoles per liter.


Processing Description

Analytical methods used for silica, phosphate, nitrite, and nitrate follow the recommendations of Gordon et al. (1993) for the WOCE WHP project.

The analytical system we employ is a five-channel Technicon Autoanalyzer II upgraded with new heating baths, proportional pumps, colorimeters, improved optics, and an analog to digital conversion system (New Analyzer Program v. 2.40 by Labtronics, Inc.) This Technicon is designed for shipboard as well as laboratory use.

Silica is determined by forming the heteropoly acid of dissolved orthosilicic acid and ammonium molybdate, reducing it with stannous chloride, and then measuring its optical transmittance.

Phosphate is determined by creating the phosphomolybdate heteropoly acid in much the same way as with the silica method. However, its reducing agent is dihydrazine sulfate, after which its transmittance is also measured. A heating bath is required to maximize the color yield.

Nitrite is determined essentially by the Bendschneider and Robinson (1952) technique in which nitrite is reacted with sulfanilamide (SAN) to form a diazotized derivative that is then reacted with a substituted ethylenediamine compound (NED) to form a rose pink azo dye which is measured colorimetrically.

Nitrate is determined by difference after a separate aliquot of a sample is passed through a Cd reduction column to convert its nitrate to nitrite, followed by the measurement of the "augmented" nitrite concentration using the same method as in the nitrite analysis.

In the analytical ammonia method, ammonium reacts with alkaline phenol and hypochlorite to form indophenolblue. Sodium nitroferricyanide intensifies the blue color formed, which is then measured in a colorimeter of our nutrient-analyzer. Precipitation of calcium and magnesium hydroxides is eliminated by the addition of sodium citrate complexing reagent. A heating bath is required. Our version of this technique is based on modifications of published methods such as the article by F. Koroleff in Grasshoff (1976). These modifications were made at Alpkem (now Astoria-Pacific International, Inc.) and at L.Gordon's nutrient laboratory at Oregon State University.


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
cruiseidcruise identification
year year
station_descstandard station number
station station identification per event log
cast CTD rosette cast number
lat latitude, negative = South DD.D
lon longitude, negative = West DDD.D
yrday_gmt year day GMT based on Julian calendar YYY
day_gmt day of month, GMT (01-31)
month_gmt month of year, GMT (01-12)
depth depth of sample meters
bottle bottle number
NO3_NO2 nitrate + nitrite micromoles/liter
NO2 nitrite micromoles/liter
SiOH_4 silicate micromoles/liter
NH4 ammonium micromoles/liter
PO4 phosphate micromoles/liter
NO3 nitrate micromoles/liter
Commentscomments


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Instruments

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Niskin Bottle
Generic Instrument Name
Niskin bottle
Dataset-specific Description
niskin bottle tripped from all hydrocasts on this cruise
Generic Instrument Description
A Niskin bottle (a next generation water sampler based on the Nansen bottle) is a cylindrical, non-metallic water collection device with stoppers at both ends. The bottles can be attached individually on a hydrowire or deployed in 12, 24 or 36 bottle Rosette systems mounted on a frame and combined with a CTD. Niskin bottles are used to collect discrete water samples for a range of measurements including pigments, nutrients, plankton, etc.

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Conductivity, Temperature, Depth
Generic Instrument Name
CTD profiler
Dataset-specific Description
CTD measurements taken, CTD unit unidentified.
Generic Instrument Description
The Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD) unit is an integrated instrument package designed to measure the conductivity, temperature, and pressure (depth) of the water column. The instrument is lowered via cable through the water column and permits scientists observe the physical properties in real time via a conducting cable connecting the CTD to a deck unit and computer on the ship. The CTD is often configured with additional optional sensors including fluorometers, transmissometers and/or radiometers. It is often combined with a Rosette of water sampling bottles (e.g. Niskin, GO-FLO) for collecting discrete water samples during the cast. This instrument designation is used when specific make and model are not known.


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Deployments

NBP0103

Website
Platform
RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer
Report
Start Date
2001-04-24
End Date
2001-06-05
Description
Acquisition Description
Nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, ammonia, and silica were measured from every niskin bottle tripped from all hydrocasts on this cruise. All concentrations are reported in micromoles per liter.

Processing Description
Analytical methods used for silica, phosphate, nitrite, and nitrate follow the recommendations of Gordon et al. (1993) for the WOCE WHP project. The analytical system we employ is a five-channel Technicon Autoanalyzer II upgraded with new heating baths, proportional pumps, colorimeters, improved optics, and an analog to digital conversion system (New Analyzer Program v. 2.40 by Labtronics, Inc.) This Technicon is designed for shipboard as well as laboratory use. Silica is determined by forming the heteropoly acid of dissolved orthosilicic acid and ammonium molybdate, reducing it with stannous chloride, and then measuring its optical transmittance. Phosphate is determined by creating the phosphomolybdate heteropoly acid in much the same way as with the silica method. However, its reducing agent is dihydrazine sulfate, after which its transmittance is also measured. A heating bath is required to maximize the color yield. Nitrite is determined essentially by the Bendschneider and Robinson (1952) technique in which nitrite is reacted with sulfanilamide (SAN) to form a diazotized derivative that is then reacted with a substituted ethylenediamine compound (NED) to form a rose pink azo dye which is measured colorimetrically. Nitrate is determined by difference after a separate aliquot of a sample is passed through a Cd reduction column to convert its nitrate to nitrite, followed by the measurement of the "augmented" nitrite concentration using the same method as in the nitrite analysis. In the analytical ammonia method, ammonium reacts with alkaline phenol and hypochlorite to form indophenolblue. Sodium nitroferricyanide intensifies the blue color formed, which is then measured in a colorimeter of our nutrient-analyzer. Precipitation of calcium and magnesium hydroxides is eliminated by the addition of sodium citrate complexing reagent. A heating bath is required. Our version of this technique is based on modifications of published methods such as the article by F. Koroleff in Grasshoff (1976). These modifications were made at Alpkem (now Astoria-Pacific International, Inc.) and at L.Gordon's nutrient laboratory at Oregon State University.

NBP0104

Website
Platform
RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer
Report
Start Date
2001-07-22
End Date
2001-08-31
Description
Acquisition Description
Nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, ammonia, and silica were measured from every niskin bottle tripped from all hydrocasts on this cruise. All concentrations are reported in micromoles per liter.

Processing Description
Analytical methods used for silica, phosphate, nitrite, and nitrate follow the recommendations of Gordon et al. (1993) for the WOCE WHP project. The analytical system we employ is a five-channel Technicon Autoanalyzer II upgraded with new heating baths, proportional pumps, colorimeters, improved optics, and an analog to digital conversion system (New Analyzer Program v. 2.40 by Labtronics, Inc.) This Technicon is designed for shipboard as well as laboratory use. Silica is determined by forming the heteropoly acid of dissolved orthosilicic acid and ammonium molybdate, reducing it with stannous chloride, and then measuring its optical transmittance. Phosphate is determined by creating the phosphomolybdate heteropoly acid in much the same way as with the silica method. However, its reducing agent is dihydrazine sulfate, after which its transmittance is also measured. A heating bath is required to maximize the color yield. Nitrite is determined essentially by the Bendschneider and Robinson (1952) technique in which nitrite is reacted with sulfanilamide (SAN) to form a diazotized derivative that is then reacted with a substituted ethylenediamine compound (NED) to form a rose pink azo dye which is measured colorimetrically. Nitrate is determined by difference after a separate aliquot of a sample is passed through a Cd reduction column to convert its nitrate to nitrite, followed by the measurement of the "augmented" nitrite concentration using the same method as in the nitrite analysis. In the analytical ammonia method, ammonium reacts with alkaline phenol and hypochlorite to form indophenolblue. Sodium nitroferricyanide intensifies the blue color formed, which is then measured in a colorimeter of our nutrient-analyzer. Precipitation of calcium and magnesium hydroxides is eliminated by the addition of sodium citrate complexing reagent. A heating bath is required. Our version of this technique is based on modifications of published methods such as the article by F. Koroleff in Grasshoff (1976). These modifications were made at Alpkem (now Astoria-Pacific International, Inc.) and at L.Gordon's nutrient laboratory at Oregon State University.

NBP0202

Website
Platform
RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer
Report
Start Date
2002-04-09
End Date
2002-05-21
Description
Acquisition Description
Nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, ammonia, and silica were measured from every niskin bottle tripped from all hydrocasts on this cruise. All concentrations are reported in micromoles per liter.

Processing Description
Analytical methods used for silica, phosphate, nitrite, and nitrate follow the recommendations of Gordon et al. (1993) for the WOCE WHP project. The analytical system we employ is a five-channel Technicon Autoanalyzer II upgraded with new heating baths, proportional pumps, colorimeters, improved optics, and an analog to digital conversion system (New Analyzer Program v. 2.40 by Labtronics, Inc.) This Technicon is designed for shipboard as well as laboratory use. Silica is determined by forming the heteropoly acid of dissolved orthosilicic acid and ammonium molybdate, reducing it with stannous chloride, and then measuring its optical transmittance. Phosphate is determined by creating the phosphomolybdate heteropoly acid in much the same way as with the silica method. However, its reducing agent is dihydrazine sulfate, after which its transmittance is also measured. A heating bath is required to maximize the color yield. Nitrite is determined essentially by the Bendschneider and Robinson (1952) technique in which nitrite is reacted with sulfanilamide (SAN) to form a diazotized derivative that is then reacted with a substituted ethylenediamine compound (NED) to form a rose pink azo dye which is measured colorimetrically. Nitrate is determined by difference after a separate aliquot of a sample is passed through a Cd reduction column to convert its nitrate to nitrite, followed by the measurement of the "augmented" nitrite concentration using the same method as in the nitrite analysis. In the analytical ammonia method, ammonium reacts with alkaline phenol and hypochlorite to form indophenolblue. Sodium nitroferricyanide intensifies the blue color formed, which is then measured in a colorimeter of our nutrient-analyzer. Precipitation of calcium and magnesium hydroxides is eliminated by the addition of sodium citrate complexing reagent. A heating bath is required. Our version of this technique is based on modifications of published methods such as the article by F. Koroleff in Grasshoff (1976). These modifications were made at Alpkem (now Astoria-Pacific International, Inc.) and at L.Gordon's nutrient laboratory at Oregon State University.

NBP0204

Website
Platform
RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer
Report
Start Date
2002-07-31
End Date
2002-09-18
Description
Acquisition Description
Nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, ammonia, and silica were measured from every niskin bottle tripped from all hydrocasts on this cruise. All concentrations are reported in micromoles per liter.

Processing Description
Analytical methods used for silica, phosphate, nitrite, and nitrate follow the recommendations of Gordon et al. (1993) for the WOCE WHP project. The analytical system we employ is a five-channel Technicon Autoanalyzer II upgraded with new heating baths, proportional pumps, colorimeters, improved optics, and an analog to digital conversion system (New Analyzer Program v. 2.40 by Labtronics, Inc.) This Technicon is designed for shipboard as well as laboratory use. Silica is determined by forming the heteropoly acid of dissolved orthosilicic acid and ammonium molybdate, reducing it with stannous chloride, and then measuring its optical transmittance. Phosphate is determined by creating the phosphomolybdate heteropoly acid in much the same way as with the silica method. However, its reducing agent is dihydrazine sulfate, after which its transmittance is also measured. A heating bath is required to maximize the color yield. Nitrite is determined essentially by the Bendschneider and Robinson (1952) technique in which nitrite is reacted with sulfanilamide (SAN) to form a diazotized derivative that is then reacted with a substituted ethylenediamine compound (NED) to form a rose pink azo dye which is measured colorimetrically. Nitrate is determined by difference after a separate aliquot of a sample is passed through a Cd reduction column to convert its nitrate to nitrite, followed by the measurement of the "augmented" nitrite concentration using the same method as in the nitrite analysis. In the analytical ammonia method, ammonium reacts with alkaline phenol and hypochlorite to form indophenolblue. Sodium nitroferricyanide intensifies the blue color formed, which is then measured in a colorimeter of our nutrient-analyzer. Precipitation of calcium and magnesium hydroxides is eliminated by the addition of sodium citrate complexing reagent. A heating bath is required. Our version of this technique is based on modifications of published methods such as the article by F. Koroleff in Grasshoff (1976). These modifications were made at Alpkem (now Astoria-Pacific International, Inc.) and at L.Gordon's nutrient laboratory at Oregon State University.


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Project Information

U.S. GLOBEC Southern Ocean (SOGLOBEC)


Coverage: Southern Ocean


The fundamental objectives of United States Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (U.S. GLOBEC) Program are dependent upon the cooperation of scientists from several disciplines. Physicists, biologists, and chemists must make use of data collected during U.S. GLOBEC field programs to further our understanding of the interplay of physics, biology, and chemistry. Our objectives require quantitative analysis of interdisciplinary data sets and, therefore, data must be exchanged between researchers. To extract the full scientific value, data must be made available to the scientific community on a timely basis.


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Program Information

U.S. GLOBal ocean ECosystems dynamics (U.S. GLOBEC)


Coverage: Global


U.S. GLOBEC (GLOBal ocean ECosystems dynamics) is a research program organized by oceanographers and fisheries scientists to address the question of how global climate change may affect the abundance and production of animals in the sea. The U.S. GLOBEC Program currently had major research efforts underway in the Georges Bank / Northwest Atlantic Region, and the Northeast Pacific (with components in the California Current and in the Coastal Gulf of Alaska). U.S. GLOBEC was a major contributor to International GLOBEC efforts in the Southern Ocean and Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP).


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Funding

Funding SourceAward
NSF Antarctic Sciences (NSF ANT)

[ table of contents | back to top ]