Urea concentrations from multiple HOE-DYLAN cruises from July to September 2012 (C-MORE project)

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/4055
Version: 04 October 2013
Version Date: 2013-10-04

Project
» Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Karl, David M.University of Hawaii at Manoa (SOEST)Principal Investigator
Segura-Noguera, MarionaUniversity of Hawaii at Manoa (SOEST)Contact
Nahorniak, JasmineOregon State University (OSU-CEOAS)Data Manager
Gegg, Stephen R.Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager


Dataset Description

N-urea data from HOE-DYLAN casts.

In the summer of 2012, C-MORE conducted a "continuous" long-term field experiment at Station ALOHA to observe and interpret temporal variability in microbial processes, and the consequences for ecological dynamics and biogeochemical cycling. Special focus was given to time-space coupling because proper scale sampling of the marine environment is an imperative, but generally neglected aspect of marine microbiology.

Hawaii Ocean Experiment - Dynamics of Light and Nutrients (HOE-DYLAN)

These data are restricted to C-MORE members only. Please contact Mariona Segura-Noguera if you would like to use these data (mariona.segura@gmail.com)


Acquisition Description

These low level nutrient measurements were made with an LWCC (not the usual autoanalyzer). The methods were developed by Susan Curless and Mariona Segura-Noguera.


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Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
cruise_idcruise ID text
datedate YYYYMMDD
timetime of day (GMT) HHMM
stastation number dimensionless
castcast number dimensionless
botrosette bottle number dimensionless
latStation Latitude; South is negative decimal degrees
lonStation Longitude; West is negative decimal degrees
presspressure from CTD dbar
temptemperature from CTD degrees Celsius
salsalinity from CTD PSS-78
O2dissolved oxygen from CTD micromoles/kilogram
fluor_rerescaled fluorescence from CTD to estimate chlorophyll micrograms/liter
UreaN-urea nanomoles/liter
Urea_sdstandard deviation for Urea nanomoles/liter


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Instruments

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Niskin bottle
Generic Instrument Name
Niskin bottle
Generic Instrument Description
A Niskin bottle (a next generation water sampler based on the Nansen bottle) is a cylindrical, non-metallic water collection device with stoppers at both ends. The bottles can be attached individually on a hydrowire or deployed in 12, 24, or 36 bottle Rosette systems mounted on a frame and combined with a CTD. Niskin bottles are used to collect discrete water samples for a range of measurements including pigments, nutrients, plankton, etc.

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Fluorometer
Generic Instrument Name
Fluorometer
Generic Instrument Description
A fluorometer or fluorimeter is a device used to measure parameters of fluorescence: its intensity and wavelength distribution of emission spectrum after excitation by a certain spectrum of light. The instrument is designed to measure the amount of stimulated electromagnetic radiation produced by pulses of electromagnetic radiation emitted into a water sample or in situ.

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
CTD Sea-Bird SBE 911plus
Generic Instrument Name
CTD Sea-Bird SBE 911plus
Generic Instrument Description
The Sea-Bird SBE 911plus is a type of CTD instrument package for continuous measurement of conductivity, temperature and pressure. The SBE 911plus includes the SBE 9plus Underwater Unit and the SBE 11plus Deck Unit (for real-time readout using conductive wire) for deployment from a vessel. The combination of the SBE 9plus and SBE 11plus is called a SBE 911plus. The SBE 9plus uses Sea-Bird's standard modular temperature and conductivity sensors (SBE 3plus and SBE 4). The SBE 9plus CTD can be configured with up to eight auxiliary sensors to measure other parameters including dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, fluorescence, light (PAR), light transmission, etc.). more information from Sea-Bird Electronics

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Liquid Waveguide Capillary Cells
Generic Instrument Name
Liquid Waveguide Capillary Cells
Dataset-specific Description
These low level nutrient measurements were made with an LWCC (not the usual autoanalyzer). The methods were developed by Susan Curless and Mariona Segura-Noguera.
Generic Instrument Description
Liquid Waveguide Capillary Cells (LWCC) are optical sample cells that combine an increased optical pathlength (2-500 cm) with small sample volumes. They can be connected via optical fibers to a spectrophotometer with fiber optic capabilities. Similar to optical fibers, light is confined within the (liquid) core of an LWCC by total internal reflection at the core/wall interface. Ultra-sensitive absorbance measurements can be performed in the ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) to detect low sample concentrations in a laboratory or process control environment. According to Beer’s Law the absorbance signal is proportional to chemical concentration and light path length.


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Deployments

KM1215

Website
Platform
R/V Kilo Moana
Start Date
2012-07-08
End Date
2012-07-28
Description
In the summer of 2012, C-MORE conducted a "continuous" long-term field experiment at Station ALOHA to observe and interpret temporal variability in microbial processes, and the consequences for ecological dynamics and biogeochemical cycling. Special focus was given to time-space coupling because proper scale sampling of the marine environment is an imperative, but generally neglected aspect of marine microbiology. Hawaii Ocean Experiment - Dynamics of Light and Nutrients (HOE-DYLAN)

KM1217

Website
Platform
R/V Kilo Moana
Start Date
2012-08-05
End Date
2012-08-14
Description
In the summer of 2012, C-MORE conducted a "continuous" long-term field experiment at Station ALOHA to observe and interpret temporal variability in microbial processes, and the consequences for ecological dynamics and biogeochemical cycling. Special focus was given to time-space coupling because proper scale sampling of the marine environment is an imperative, but generally neglected aspect of marine microbiology. Hawaii Ocean Experiment - Dynamics of Light and Nutrients (HOE-DYLAN)

KM1219

Website
Platform
R/V Kilo Moana
Start Date
2012-08-22
End Date
2012-09-11
Description
In the summer of 2012, C-MORE conducted a "continuous" long-term field experiment at Station ALOHA to observe and interpret temporal variability in microbial processes, and the consequences for ecological dynamics and biogeochemical cycling. Special focus was given to time-space coupling because proper scale sampling of the marine environment is an imperative, but generally neglected aspect of marine microbiology. Hawaii Ocean Experiment - Dynamics of Light and Nutrients (HOE-DYLAN)


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Project Information

Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE)


Coverage: North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (large region around 22 45 N, 158 W)


Project summary

The Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) is a recently established (August 2006; NSF award: EF-0424599) NSF-sponsored Science and Technology Center designed to facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the diverse assemblages of microorganisms in the sea, ranging from the genetic basis of marine microbial biogeochemistry including the metabolic regulation and environmental controls of gene expression, to the processes that underpin the fluxes of carbon, related bioelements and energy in the marine environment. Stated holistically, C-MORE's primary mission is: Linking Genomes to Biomes.

We believe that the time is right to address several major, long-standing questions in microbial oceanography. Recent advances in the application of molecular techniques have provided an unprecedented view of the structure, diversity and possible function of sea microbes. By combining these and other novel approaches with more well-established techniques in microbiology, oceanography and ecology, it may be possible to develop a meaningful predictive understanding of the ocean with respect to energy transduction, carbon sequestration, bioelement cycling and the probable response of marine ecosystems to global environmental variability and climate change. The strength of C-MORE resides in the synergy created by bringing together experts who traditionally have not worked together and this, in turn, will facilitate the creation and dissemination of new knowledge on the role of marine microbes in global habitability.

The new Center will design and conduct novel research, broker partnerships, increase diversity of human resources, implement education and outreach programs, and utilize comprehensive information about microbial life in the sea. The Center will bring together teams of scientists, educators and community members who otherwise do not have an opportunity to communicate, collaborate or design creative solutions to long-term ecosystem scale problems. The Center's research will be organized around four interconnected themes:

  • (Theme I) microbial biodiversity,
  • (Theme II) metabolism and C-N-P-energy flow,
  • (Theme III) remote and continuous sensing and links to climate variability, and
  • (Theme IV) ecosystem modeling, simulation and prediction.

  Each theme will have a leader to help coordinate the research programs and to facilitate interactions among the other related themes. The education programs will focus on pre-college curriculum enhancements, in service teacher training and formal undergraduate/graduate and post-doctoral programs to prepare the next generation of microbial oceanographers. The Center will establish and maintain creative outreach programs to help diffuse the new knowledge gained into society at large including policymakers. The Center's activities will be dispersed among five partner institutions:

  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
  • Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution,
  • Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute,
  • University of California at Santa Cruz and
  • Oregon State University

and will be coordinated at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

Related Files:

Strategic plan (PDF file)



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Funding

Funding SourceAward
National Science Foundation (NSF)

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