Dataset:Light data in tanks from experiment on brooded coral larval, Taiwan, March 2011 (Cumbo et al, JEMBE, 2012) (MCR LTER project, Climate_Coral_Larvae project)
Project(s):Moorea Coral Reef Long Term Ecological Research site (MCR LTER)
The ecophysiological basis of the response of coral larvae and early life history stages to global climate change (Climate_Coral_Larvae)
Description:Light data in tanks from experiment on brooded coral larval, March 2011 (Cumbo et al, JEMBE, 2012)

The physiological development of brooded larvae from the pocilloporid corals Pocillopora damicornis in southern Taiwan under elevated temperature and pCO2 was examined.

These data include light measurements from experiments on the physiological development of brooded coral larvae conducted in March 2011.  

Related datasets:

brooded coral larvae 3 - carbonate chemistry
brooded coral larvae 3 - mortality
brooded coral larvae 3 - protein
brooded coral larvae 3 - respiration and protein
brooded coral larvae 3 - respiration raw data
brooded coral larvae 3 - symbiont density
brooded coral larvae 3 - tank temperature

These data are published in Cumbo, VR, Fan TY, Edmunds PJ. Effects of exposure duration on the response of Pocillopora damicornis larvae to elevated temperature and high pCO2. J Exp Mar Biol Ecol 439: 100-107.

Download tank physical data (Excel file)
Download biological data for this publication (Excel file)
Data also available from PANGAEA: doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.823582

Acquisition Description:

Treatments were created in eight 150 L tanks, each filled with 120 L of filtered (1 um) seawater that was changed partially (20%) every day (at ~17:00 h). Tanks were individually heated (300 Wheaters, Taikong Corporation) and chilled (Aquatech Ac11 or Shyeh Duwai Enterprise), with the temperature regulated using programmable, digital controllers (±0.1 °C, AquaControllers, Neptune Systems). Illumination was provided by metal halide (Phillips 150 W 10,000 k) and fluorescent (39 W, Phillips T5 460 nm) bulbs to create a mean light intensity of 268± 17 µmol quanta m-2 s-1 (±SE, n=64). The light intensity was selected to approximate that found at the collection depth of the parent colonies in March.

Treatments were created by blending CO2 with air, and continually assessing the mixture through an Infra Red gas analyzer (S151, Qubit Systems), which dynamically adjusted the flow of CO2 to maintain desired levels. The gas mixture was supplied through an air stone to four of the eight tanks, with others supplied with compressed air (i.e., ambient pCO2). The conditions in the tanks were analyzed for pH, salinity, temperature, and total alkalinity (TA) using standard operating procedures (Dickson et al., 2007), and the program CO2SYS (Lewis and Wallace, 1998) to calculate DIC parameters. The gas mixing technology and the methods for seawater analyses essentially are identical to those we have used before (see Dufault et al., 2012; Edmunds, 2011). In the present analysis, the calculated TA values of certified reference materials supplied by Dr. Andrew Dickson, Scripps Institute of Oceanography (batch no. 98 and 107), were determined within a mean of 1% of the certified value.

The incubation system created target temperatures of ~24.00 °C versus 30.50 °C, and target pCO2 values of ambient versus 86.1 Pa, and an irradiance of ~268 µmol quanta m-2 s-1. Conditions in the tanks were measured at least daily using a certified digital thermometer (Model 15-077-8, Fisher Scientific,±0.05 °C), a cosine-corrected quantum light meter (Li-Cor LI-192 attached to an LI-1400), and a sample ofwater withdrawn from each tank for pH, salinity, and TA analysis.

 

Relevent References:

Dufault AM, Cumbo VR, Fan TY, Edmunds PJ (2012) Effects of diurnally oscillating pCO2 on the calcification and survival of coral recruits. Proc R Soc B. doi:10.1098/rspb.2011.2545

Dickson, A.G., Sabine, C.L., Christian, J.R. (Eds.), 2007. Guide to best practices for ocean CO2 measurements: PICES Special Publication, 3, p. 191.

Edmunds, P.J., 2011. Zooplanktivory ameliorates the effects of ocean acidification on the reef coral Porites spp. Limnol. Oceanogr. 56, 2402-2410.

Lewis, E., Wallace, D.W.R., 1998. MS excel program developed for CO2 system calculations. ORNL/CDIAC-105a. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge

Processing Description:

BCO-DMO processing notes:

- added conventional header with dataset name, PI name, version date, reference information
- renamed parameters to BCO-DMO standard
- added lab, lat, lon columns
- reformatted date from m/d/yyyy to yyyy-mm-dd
- reformatted time from h:mm to hhmm

Project Information

Moorea Coral Reef Long Term Ecological Research site

From http://www.lternet.edu/sites/mcr/ and http://mcr.lternet.edu/: The Moorea Coral Reef LTER site encompasses the coral reef complex that surrounds the island of Moorea, French Polynesia (17°30'S, 149°50'W). Moorea is a small, triangular volcanic island 20 km west of Tahiti in the Society Islands of French Polynesia. An offshore barrier reef forms a system of shallow (mean depth ~ 5-7 m), narrow (~0.8-1.5 km wide) lagoons around the 60 km perimeter of Moorea. All major coral reef types (e.g., fringing reef, lagoon patch reefs, back reef, barrier reef and fore reef) are present and accessible by small boat. The MCR LTER was established in 2004 by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and is a partnership between the University of California Santa Barbara and California State University, Northridge. MCR researchers include marine scientists from the UC Santa Barbara, CSU Northridge, UC Davis, UC Santa Cruz, UC San Diego, CSU San Marcos, Duke University and the University of Hawaii. Field operations are conducted from the UC Berkeley Richard B. Gump South Pacific Research Station on the island of Moorea, French Polynesia. MCR LTER Data: The Moorea Coral Reef (MCR) LTER data are managed by and available directly from the MCR project data site URL shown above.  The datasets listed below were collected at or near the MCR LTER sampling locations, and funded by NSF OCE as ancillary projects related to the MCR LTER core research themes. The following publications and data resulted from this project: 2012 Edmunds PJ. Effect of pCO2 on the growth, respiration, and photophysiology of massive Porites spp. in Moorea, French Polynesia. Marine Biology 159: 2149-2160. doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.820375Porites growth_respiration_photophysDownload complete data for this publication (Excel file)

The ecophysiological basis of the response of coral larvae and early life history stages to global climate change

Tropical coral reefs face a suite of environmental assaults ranging from anchor damage to the effects of global climate change (GCC). The consequences are evident throughout the tropics, where many coral reefs have lost a substantial fraction of their coral cover in a few decades. Notwithstanding the importance of reducing the impacts of environmental stresses, the only means by which these ecosystems can recover (or simply persist) is through the recruitment of scleractinians, which is a function of successful larval development, delivery, settlement, metamorphosis, and post-settlement events. Despite wide recognition of the importance of these processes, there are few pertinent empirical data, and virtually none that address the mechanisms mediating the success of early coral life stages in a physical environmental varying at multiple spatio-temporal scales. The objective of this research is to complete one of the first comprehensive ecophysiological analyses of the early life stages of corals through a description of: (1) their functionality under 'normal' conditions, and (2) their response to the main drivers of GCC. These analyses will be completed for 2 species representative of a brooding life history strategy, and the experiments will be completed in two locations, one (Taiwan) that provides unrivalled experience in coral reproductive biology, and superb microcosm facilities, and the other (Moorea), with access to a relatively pristine environment, a well described ecological and oceanographic context (through the MCR-LTER), and the capacity to bring a strong biogeographic contrast to the project. The results of the study will be integrated through modeling to explore the effects of GCC on coral community structure over the next century. The following publications and data resulted from this project: 2013    Wall CB, Fan TY, Edmunds PJ.  Ocean acidification has no effect on thermal bleaching in the coral Seriatopora caliendrum.  Coral Reefs 33: 119-130.Symbiodinium_Seriatopora photosynthesisSymbiodinium_Seriatopora PI curveSymbiodinium_Seriatopora temp-salinity-lightSymbiodinium_Seriatopora water chemistry- Download complete data for this publication (Excel file) 2013    Wall CB, Edmunds PJ. In situ effects of low pH and elevated HCO3- on juvenile Porites spp. in Moorea, French Polynesia.  Biological Bulletin 225:92-101. Data at MCR and PANGEA: doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.833913- Download complete data for this publication (Excel file) 2013    Vivian R Cumbo, Peter J Edmunds, Christopher B Wall, Tung-Yung Fan. Brooded coral larvae differ in their response to high temperature and elevated pCO2 depending on the day of release.  Marine Biology DOI 10.1007/s00227-013-2280-y. Data also at PANGEA: doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.831612brooded coral larvae 2 - carbonate chemistrybrooded coral larvae 2 - larval release March 2003-2008brooded coral larvae 2 - respiration_photosyth_mortality- Download complete data for this publication (Excel file) 2013    Edmunds PJ, Cumbo VR, Fan TY. Metabolic costs of larval settlement and metamorphosis in the coral Seriatopora caliendrum under ambient and elevated pCO2.  Journal Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 443: 33-38 Data also at PANGEA: doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.821644Coral post-settlement physiology- Download complete data for this publication (Excel file) 2013    Aaron M Dufault, Aaron Ninokawa, Lorenzo Bramanti, Vivian R Cumbo, Tung-Yung Fan, Peter J Edmunds.  The role of light in mediating the effects of ocean acidification on coral calcification.  Journal of Experimental Biology 216: 1570-1577.coral-light expt.- PARcoral-light expt.- carbonate chemistrycoral-light expt.- temp_salinitycoral-light expt.- growthcoral-light expt.- proteincoral-light expt.- survival- Download complete data for this publication (Excel file) 2012    Cumbo, VR, Fan TY, Edmunds PJ. Effects of exposure duration on the response of Pocillopora damicornis larvae to elevated temperature and high pCO2.  J Exp Mar Biol Ecol 439: 100-107. Data is also at PANGEA: doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.823582brooded coral larvae 3 - carbonate chemistrybrooded coral larvae 3 - lightbrooded coral larvae 3 - mortalitybrooded coral larvae 3 - proteinbrooded coral larvae 3 - respiration and proteinbrooded coral larvae 3 - respiration raw databrooded coral larvae 3 - symbiont densitybrooded coral larvae 3 - tank temperature- Download part 1 of data for this publication (Excel file)- Download tank parameters data for this publication (Excel file) 2012    Cumbo, VR, Fan TY, Edmunds PJ.  Physiological development of brooded larvae from two pocilloporid corals in Taiwan.  Marine Biology 159: 2853-2866.brooded coral - carbonate chemistrybrooded coral - releasebrooded coral - respirationbrooded coral - settlement competencybrooded coral - size_Julybrooded coral - size_protein_symbionts_photosynth- Download complete data for this publication (Excel file) 2012    Dufault, Aaron M; Vivian R Cumbo; Tung-Yung Fan; Peter J Edmunds.  Effects of diurnally oscillating pCO2 on the calcification and survival of coral recruits.  Royal Society of London (B) 279: 2951-2958.  doi:10.1098/rspb.2011.2545 Data is also at PANGEA: doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.830185recruit_growth_arearecruit_growth_weightrecruit_seawater_chemistryrecruit_survival- Download complete data for this publication (Excel file) 2011    Edmunds PJ, Cumbo V, Fan TY.  Effects of temperature on the respiration of brooded larvae from tropical reef corals.  Journal of Experimental Biology 214: 2783-2790. CoralLarvae_comparison_respirCoralLarvae_releaseCoralLarvae_respirCoralLarvae_size- Download complete data for this publication (Excel file)



Deployment Information

Deployment description for Natl Museum Mar. Bio. and Aquar. Taiwan lab_Edmunds_NMMBA

Experiments related to the research project:  'RUI- The ecophysiological basis of the response of coral larvae and early life history stages to global climate change' were conducted at the laboratories of the National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium in Southern Taiwan.



Instrument Information

Instrument LI-COR LI-192 light sensor
Description cosine-corrected quantum light meter (Li-Cor LI-192 attached to an LI-1400)
Generic Instrument Name LI-COR LI-192 PAR Sensor
Generic Instrument Description The LI-192 Underwater Quantum Sensor (UWQ) measures underwater or atmospheric Photon Flux Density (PPFD) (Photosynthetically Available Radiation from 360 degrees) using a Silicon Photodiode and glass filters encased in a waterproof housing. The LI-192 is cosine corrected and features corrosion resistant, rugged construction for use in freshwater or saltwater and pressures up to 800 psi (5500 kPa, 560 meters depth). Typical output is in um s-1 m-2. The LI-192 uses computer-tailored filter glass to achieve the desired quantum response. Calibration is traceable to NIST. The LI-192 serial numbers begin with UWQ-XXXXX. LI-COR has been producing Underwater Quantum Sensors since 1973. These LI-192 sensors are typically listed as LI-192SA to designate the 2-pin connector on the base of the housing and require an Underwater Cable (LI-COR part number 2222UWB) to connect to the pins on the Sensor and connect to a data recording device. The LI-192 differs from the LI-193 primarily in sensitivity and angular response. 193: Sensitivity: Typically 7 uA per 1000 umol s-1 m-2 in water. Azimuth: < ± 3% error over 360° at 90° from normal axis. Angular Response: < ± 4% error up to ± 90° from normal axis 192: Sensitivity: Typically 4 uA per 1000 umol s-1 m-2 in water. Azimuth: < ± 1% error over 360° at 45° elevation. Cosine Correction: Optimized for underwater and atmospheric use. (www.licor.com)

Instrument Water Temp Sensor
Description certified digital thermometer (Model 15-077-8, Fisher Scientific,±0.05 °C)
Generic Instrument Name Water Temperature Sensor
Generic Instrument Description General term for an instrument that measures the temperature of the water with which it is in contact (thermometer).

Instrument Gas Analyzer
Description Infra Red gas analyzer (S151, Qubit Systems)
Generic Instrument Name Gas Analyzer
Generic Instrument Description Gas Analyzers - Instruments for determining the qualitative and quantitative composition of gas mixtures.

Instrument Immersion heater
Description 300 Wheaters, Taikong Corporation
Generic Instrument Name Immersion heater
Generic Instrument Description Submersible heating element for water tanks and aquaria.

Instrument Aquarium chiller
Description Aquatech Ac11 or Shyeh Duwai Enterprise
Generic Instrument Name Aquarium chiller
Generic Instrument Description Immersible or in-line liquid cooling device, usually with temperature control.