Ciliate escape response micro-PIV videos collected in the North Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico from 2011-2014 (Protist Behavior and Imposed Flow project)

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/636406
Data Type: experimental
Version: 2016-01-25

Project
» Linking Propulsive Morphology, Swimming Behavior and Sensory Perception by Marine Planktonic Protists to their Trophic Roles within Marine Food Webs (Protist Behavior and Imposed Flow)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Buskey, Edward J.University of Texas - Marine Science Institute (UTMSI)Principal Investigator
Gemmell, BradUniversity of South Florida (USF)Contact
Copley, NancyWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager


Dataset Description

Related Reference:
Gemmell et al. 2015. A tale of the ciliate tail: investigation into the adaptive significance of this sub-cellular structure. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 282 (1812) DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.0770

Related Datasets:
Ciliate PIV data
Ciliate PIV data: Fig 3-RSBP


Acquisition Description


Processing Description

BCO-DMO Processing:

Downloaded .avi files from Dryad [2016-01-25]


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Related Publications

Gemmell, B. J., Jiang, H., & Buskey, E. J. (2015). A tale of the ciliate tail: investigation into the adaptive significance of this sub-cellular structure. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 282(1812), 20150770. doi:10.1098/rspb.2015.0770
Results

[ table of contents | back to top ]

Related Datasets

Different Version
Gemmell, B. J., Jiang, H., & Buskey, E. J. (2015). Data from: A tale of the ciliate tail: investigation into the adaptive significance of this sub-cellular structure [Data set]. Dryad Digital Repository. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.r5f7m

[ table of contents | back to top ]

Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
figFigure number citing the video: Gemmell et al (2015) RSBP unitless
descriptionDescription of PIV video subject unitless
fps_playbackframes per second during playback frames per second
file_size_MBsize of video file megabytes
file_linklink to the video file unitless


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Instruments

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
Generic Instrument Name
Camera
Dataset-specific Description
Photron SA6 high-speed camera with a 150W fiber optic illuminator (Fisher Scientific)
Generic Instrument Description
All types of photographic equipment including stills, video, film and digital systems.


[ table of contents | back to top ]

Project Information

Linking Propulsive Morphology, Swimming Behavior and Sensory Perception by Marine Planktonic Protists to their Trophic Roles within Marine Food Webs (Protist Behavior and Imposed Flow)

Coverage: US coastal North Atlantic water, and US coastal Gulf of Mexico water


Description from NSF award abstract:
One of the central issues in biological oceanography is to understand the processes that regulate the biomass and distribution of phytoplankton in the ocean. The fate of most phytoplankton is to be consumed by grazers, and it is now generally accepted that marine planktonic protists are the most important grazers on phytoplankton, and that grazing by protists can fundamentally affect phytoplankton biomass and distribution in the ocean. Protists can become temporarily very abundant (up to tens of thousands per liter) and can grow nearly as rapidly as phytoplankton do, which gives them great potential to regulate phytoplankton populations. Adaptations by protists to feed selectively on the fastest growing species of phytoplankton and to reduce predation by metazoan zooplankton should enhance the coupling between phytoplankton growth and grazing, and therefore promote planktonic ecosystem stability. Compared to larger metazoan zooplankton such as copepods, relatively little is known about the morphological and behavioral adaptations in protists for selective feeding and predator avoidance.

The PIs will study details of selective feeding behavior and predator avoidance behavior of free-swimming planktonic protists in 3-dimension using high-speed video. Under the same conditions, they will measure flow fields imposed by individual free-swimming protists using a time-resolving stereo micro-particle image velocimetry (microPIV) system. To gain a mechanistic understanding, they will also conduct empirical data-driven, reality-reproducing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the protist-imposed flow fields. The results will be used to test the hypothesis that diversity and flexibility in propulsive morphology facilitates protists to achieve sophisticated swimming behaviors and sensory perception capabilities that adapt them for selective feeding and predator avoidance. These capabilities may also serve as important driving forces for protistan biodiversity, represented by various sizes, shapes, propulsive morphologies and motility patterns.



[ table of contents | back to top ]

Funding

Funding SourceAward
NSF Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE)

[ table of contents | back to top ]