California mussel body size data for RNA-Seq project from UCSB Mussel Growth study from Hofmann laboratory at Campus Point, Goleta, CA in 2015 (OMEGAS-II project)

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/639731
Version: 07 March 2016
Version Date: 2016-03-07

Project
» OMEGAS II - Linking ecological and organismal responses to the ocean acidification seascape in the California Current System (OMEGAS-II)

Program
» Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability NSF-Wide Investment (SEES): Ocean Acidification (formerly CRI-OA) (SEES-OA)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Hofmann, Gretchen E.University of California-Santa Barbara (UCSB-LifeSci)Principal Investigator
Washburn, LibeUniversity of California-Santa Barbara (UCSB-MSI)Contact
Gegg, Stephen R.Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager


Dataset Description

Mussel Growth Data - UCSB - Mussel body size data for RNA-Seq project

63h D-hinge larvae reared under 350µatm and 1300 µatm, described in: High pCO2 affects body size, but not gene expression in larvae of the California mussel (Mytilus californianus)

Sample Id: "11-L-un" or "12-H-un"
Where H refers to high CO2
L= low CO2
The number is bucket number
And 'un' refers to the fact the cultures were unfiltered

Related Reference:
Kelly, M.W., J. L. Padilla-Gamiño, G. E. Hofmann (2015) High pCO2 affects body size, but not gene expression in larvae of the California mussel (Mytilus californianus). ICES Journal of Marine Science. doi: 10.1093/icesjms/fsv184.


Acquisition Description

63h D-hinge larvae reared under 350µatm and 1300 µatm, described in: High pCO2 affects body size, but not gene expression in larvae of the California mussel (Mytilus californianus)


Processing Description

BCO-DMO Processing Notes
 - Generated from original file: "Mussel size data for ICES JMS paper.xlsx" contributed by Gretchen Hofmann
 - Parameter names edited to conform to BCO-DMO naming convention found at Choosing Parameter Name
 - Site and Lat/Lon of site added from published paper


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Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
SITESite Id text
LatitudeLatitude (South is negative) decimal degrees
LongitudeLongitude (West is negative) decimal degrees
sampleIDsampleID Where H refers to high CO2 L= low CO2 The number is bucket number And 'un' refers to the fact the cultures were unfiltered text
FAMILYFAMILY text
co2_treatco2 treatment text
max_diametermax_diameter mm

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Deployments

Hofmann_CampusPoint_Goleta_CA

Website
Platform
CampusPoint_Goleta_CA
Start Date
2015-01-15
End Date
2015-01-15


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Project Information

OMEGAS II - Linking ecological and organismal responses to the ocean acidification seascape in the California Current System (OMEGAS-II)


Coverage: California Current Large Marine Ecosystem, Oregon, California


Project abstract: This project is a renewal of an existing ocean acidification (OA) grant supporting an interdisciplinary research team (called OMEGAS) with expertise in oceanography, ecology, biogeochemistry, molecular physiology, and molecular genetics. Research to date has documented a dynamic oceanographic mosaic in the inner shelf of the California Current System (CCS) that spans 1,200+ km and varies at tidal, diurnal, event, and seasonal temporal scales at local to ocean basin spatial scales. In OMEGAS II, the project seeks to better understand the drivers of this striking time-space variability, and to link the OA seascape to the physiological and ecological performance of a key member of this ecosystem, the mussel Mytilus californianus. In addition, the investigators will explore the influence of this oceanographic mosaic on species interactions and community organization. As a dominant habitat-forming species, strong interactor, and major space occupant, M. californianus is arguably the core component of the rocky intertidal ecosystem along the upwelling-dominated CCS. Using an interdisciplinary, spatially extensive approach integrating inner shelf oceanography with ecology, physiology, and eco-mechanics, the interdisciplinary team will study the response of juvenile mussels M. californianus to OA. The studies span levels of biological organization, thereby allowing assessment of how the cost of forming a shell under field conditions might influence physiological performance and resistance to predation. This investigation will include modeling to link to larger-scale ecosystem and oceanographic dynamics in the CCS and beyond. Results from OMEGAS I show that the growth, survival, and shell strength of mussel larvae are strongly negatively affected by elevated pCO2, and that growth of adult mussels varied among sites within regions and between regions. Emerging data on natural variability in seawater conditions will allow a deeper exploration of the organismal response of M. californianus, and the ecological consequences of traits, such as reduced shell thickness and strength. The present project will expand and strengthen the existing oceanographic network to increase our understanding of the coastal OA regime, and provide the environmental context for ecological and physiological research. Specifically, this project will (1) conduct field and laboratory experiments on the influence of OA on the growth, shell accretion, and resistance to predation of juvenile mussels collected from 10 sites spanning 1,400 km of coastline, (2) link the OA-sensor oceanographic "backbone" to an existing database of community structure via ecological modeling to assess the influence of OA on coastal variation in community organization, (3) determine the physiological responses of juvenile mussels following field deployments and culture under common garden conditions to evaluate mechanistic underpinnings to the responses observed in mussels from different sites, (4) explore the physiological and transcriptomic response of mussels in lab mesocosms to field-documented variability in pCO2, and (5) using modified ROMS models, evaluate the linkage between basin-scale oceanography and local-scale variation in inner-shelf oceanography to evaluate the relative influences of large-to-local scale factors on OA variability. This research aims to understand how coastal ecosystems will respond to OA, and thus to develop our capacity to predict the future impact of OA on coastal ecosystems. PUBLICATIONS PRODUCED AS A RESULT OF THIS RESEARCH Hettinger, A., E. Sanford, T. M. Hill, J. D. Hosfelt, A. D. Russell, and B. Gaylord.. "The influence of food supply on the response of Olympia oyster larvae to ocean acidification.," Biogeosciences, v.10, 2013, p. 6629. Hettinger, A., E. Sanford, T.M. Hill, E.A. Lenz, A.D. Russell, and B. Gaylord. "Larval carry-over effects from ocean acidification persist in the natural environment.," Global Change Biology, 2013. Hofmann, G. E., T. G. Evans, M. W. Kelly, J. L. Padilla-Gamiño, C. A. Blanchette, L. Washburn, F. Chan, M. A. McManus, B. A. Menge, B. Gaylord, T. M. Hill, E. Sanford, M. LaVigne, J. M. Rose, L. Kapsenberg, and J. M. Dutton.. "Exploring local adaptation and the ocean acidification seascape ? studies in the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem.," Biogeosciences Discussions, v.10, 2013, p. 11825. LaVigne, M. T.M. Hill, E. Sanford, B. Gaylord, A.D. Russell, E.A. Lenz, J.D. Hosfelt, M.K. Young.. "The elemental composition of purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) calcite and potential effects of pCO2 during early life stages.," Biogeosciences, v.10, 2013, p. 3465. Pespeni, M.H., E. Sanford, B. Gaylord, T. M. Hill, J. D. Hosfelt, H. Jaris, M. LaVigne, E. A. Lenz, A. D. Russell, M. K. Young, S. R. Palumbi.. "Evolutionary change during experimental ocean acidification.," Proceedings National Academy of Sciences, v.110, 2013, p. 6937.


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Program Information

Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability NSF-Wide Investment (SEES): Ocean Acidification (formerly CRI-OA) (SEES-OA)


Coverage: global


NSF Climate Research Investment (CRI) activities that were initiated in 2010 are now included under Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability NSF-Wide Investment (SEES). SEES is a portfolio of activities that highlights NSF's unique role in helping society address the challenge(s) of achieving sustainability. Detailed information about the SEES program is available from NSF (http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=504707). In recognition of the need for basic research concerning the nature, extent and impact of ocean acidification on oceanic environments in the past, present and future, the goal of the SEES: OA program is to understand (a) the chemistry and physical chemistry of ocean acidification; (b) how ocean acidification interacts with processes at the organismal level; and (c) how the earth system history informs our understanding of the effects of ocean acidification on the present day and future ocean. Solicitations issued under this program:NSF 10-530, FY 2010-FY2011NSF 12-500, FY 2012NSF 12-600, FY 2013NSF 13-586, FY 2014 NSF 13-586 was the final solicitation that will be released for this program. PI Meetings:1st U.S. Ocean Acidification PI Meeting(March 22-24, 2011, Woods Hole, MA)2nd U.S. Ocean Acidification PI Meeting(Sept. 18-20, 2013, Washington, DC) 3rd U.S. Ocean Acidification PI Meeting (June 9-11, 2015, Woods Hole, MA – Tentative) NSF media releases for the Ocean Acidification Program: Press Release 10-186 NSF Awards Grants to Study Effects of Ocean Acidification Discovery Blue Mussels "Hang On" Along Rocky Shores: For How Long? Discovery nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) Discoveries - Trouble in Paradise: Ocean Acidification This Way Comes - US National Science Foundation (NSF) Press Release 12-179 nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) News - Ocean Acidification: Finding New Answers Through National Science Foundation Research Grants - US National Science Foundation (NSF) Press Release 13-102 World Oceans Month Brings Mixed News for Oysters Press Release 13-108 nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) News - Natural Underwater Springs Show How Coral Reefs Respond to Ocean Acidification - US National Science Foundation (NSF) Press Release 13-148 Ocean acidification: Making new discoveries through National Science Foundation research grants Press Release 13-148 - Video nsf.gov - News - Video - NSF Ocean Sciences Division Director David Conover answers questions about ocean acidification. - US National Science Foundation (NSF) Press Release 14-010 nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) News - Palau's coral reefs surprisingly resistant to ocean acidification - US National Science Foundation (NSF) Press Release 14-116 nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) News - Ocean Acidification: NSF awards $11.4 million in new grants to study effects on marine ecosystems - US National Science Foundation (NSF)


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Funding

Funding SourceAward
NSF Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE)

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