Peyssonnelia abundance along the south shore of St. John, US Virgin Islands from surveys during 2015

Website: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/750036
Data Type: Other Field Results
Version: 1
Version Date: 2018-11-26

Project
» RUI-LTREB Renewal: Three decades of coral reef community dynamics in St. John, USVI: 2014-2019 (RUI-LTREB)
ContributorsAffiliationRole
Edmunds, Peter J.California State University Northridge (CSU-Northridge)Principal Investigator
Bramanti, LorenzoUniversité Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6) (UPMC)Co-Principal Investigator
Biddle, MathewWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI BCO-DMO)BCO-DMO Data Manager

Abstract
Peyssonnelia abundance along the south shore of St. John, US Virgin Islands from surveys during 2015. The abundance of the peyssonnelid algal crust was measured using 50 m video transects (recorded with a GoPro Hero 3) at 3, 5, and 7 m depth at five sites, haphazardly selected between Cabritte Horn and White Point on the south shore of St. John.


Coverage

Spatial Extent: Lat:18.32 Lon:-64.723
Temporal Extent: 2015 - 2015

Dataset Description

The abundance of the peyssonnelid algal crust was measured using 50 m video transects (recorded with a GoPro Hero 3) at 3, 5, and 7 m depth at five sites, haphazardly selected between Cabritte Horn and White Point on the south shore of St. John. Still images (n = 20 transect-1, each ~ 250 cm2) were randomly extracted and analyzed for percentage cover of peyssonnelids using a grid of 25 squares that were scored for dominance by this alga (i.e., 4% resolution).


Processing Description

BCO-DMO Processing Notes:

  • added conventional header with dataset name, PI name, version date
  • modified parameter names to conform with BCO-DMO naming conventions

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Related Publications

Bramanti L, Lasker HR, Edmunds PJ (2017) An encrusting peyssonnelid preempts vacant space and overgrows corals in St. John, US Virgin Islands. Reef Encounter. 32:68–70
Results

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Parameters

ParameterDescriptionUnits
Siteidentifier for the site unitless
Transect_Numberidentifier for the transect unitless
Depthdepth of observation meters (m)
Coverpercent cover percent (%)


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Instruments

Dataset-specific Instrument Name
GoPro Hero 3
Generic Instrument Name
Camera
Dataset-specific Description
recorded with a GoPro Hero 3
Generic Instrument Description
All types of photographic equipment including stills, video, film and digital systems.


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Project Information

RUI-LTREB Renewal: Three decades of coral reef community dynamics in St. John, USVI: 2014-2019 (RUI-LTREB)


Coverage: USVI


Describing how ecosystems like coral reefs are changing is at the forefront of efforts to evaluate the biological consequences of global climate change and ocean acidification. Coral reefs have become the poster child of these efforts. Amid concern that they could become ecologically extinct within a century, describing what has been lost, what is left, and what is at risk, is of paramount importance. This project exploits an unrivalled legacy of information beginning in 1987 to evaluate the form in which reefs will persist, and the extent to which they will be able to resist further onslaughts of environmental challenges. This long-term project continues a 27-year study of Caribbean coral reefs. The diverse data collected will allow the investigators to determine the roles of local and global disturbances in reef degradation. The data will also reveal the structure and function of reefs in a future with more human disturbances, when corals may no longer dominate tropical reefs.

The broad societal impacts of this project include advancing understanding of an ecosystem that has long been held emblematic of the beauty, diversity, and delicacy of the biological world. Proposed research will expose new generations of undergraduate and graduate students to natural history and the quantitative assessment of the ways in which our planet is changing. This training will lead to a more profound understanding of contemporary ecology at the same time that it promotes excellence in STEM careers and supports technology infrastructure in the United States. Partnerships will be established between universities and high schools to bring university faculty and students in contact with k-12 educators and their students, allow teachers to carry out research in inspiring coral reef locations, and motivate children to pursue STEM careers. Open access to decades of legacy data will stimulate further research and teaching.



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Funding

Funding SourceAward
NSF Division of Environmental Biology (NSF DEB)

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